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Hello guys i try to save all citynames in one array but i can not get the result how i can do it ?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
char**city1,** city2;
int distance,i=0;

city1 = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*));
city2 = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*));
    FILE* data;
data = fopen(argv[1],"r");
     //fscanf(data, "%s %s %d", city1,city2, &distance);

city1[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
while(fscanf(data, "%s %s %d",city1[i],city2[i], &distance)!=EOF){
city1[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
printf("%s\n%s\n%d\n", city1[i], city2[i], distance);
i++;}
fclose(data);
return 0;}
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1  
Is this homework? At the risk of sounding rude, I would recommend reading your favourite C textbook in order to learn more about pointers and memory allocation... –  Gnosophilon Jun 7 '12 at 19:55

4 Answers 4

You need the second pair of mallocs before fscanf(). You are writing the input to random parts of memory.

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The lines you have commented out are needed: change

 /*city1[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);*/

to:

city1[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);

because without it, the char * pointers will point to arbitrary (invalid) locations.

By the way, as a side note, it's bad practice to 1. cast the return value of malloc(), 2. use sizeof(type) instead of sizeof(*variable). So you'd better change your code into

city1[0] = malloc(sizeof(city[0][0]) * 10);
city2[0] = malloc(sizeof(city[0][0]) * 10);
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Correct me if I am wrong, but I think it's also not guaranteed that multiple lines will be read correctly. This is due to the initialization of city1 and city2. The malloc call only uses a size of sizeof(char*), but the poster probably wants to read arbitrary many lines... –  Gnosophilon Jun 7 '12 at 19:53
    
thanx it helps me –  Miribra Stacker Jun 7 '12 at 19:54
    
I just helped a bit to avoid this particular reason of the segfault. The code the OP wrote is a complete mess and should be completely redesigned anyway. –  user529758 Jun 7 '12 at 19:56
    
@H2CO3 Yes, I was in no way criticizing your solution. It indeed solves the SEGFAULT for at least a small number of city entries. In fact, I gave both answers an upvote ;) –  Gnosophilon Jun 7 '12 at 20:12
    
Me neither your comment :) It is absolutely right. Altgough I was too lazy to extend te answer this far beyond the scope of the question. These malloc casts hurted my eyes so badly that I couldn't keep looking at this page anymore ;-) –  user529758 Jun 7 '12 at 21:55

Lots of problems for such simple code.

First, note that

city1 = malloc(sizeof (char *));

only allocates a single char * instance, not an array of char *. You've basically allocated city1 and city2 to hold a single pointer to char each. If you want city1 and city2 to each hold N pointers to char, then you need to write that as

city1 = malloc(sizeof (char *) * N);

or

city1 = malloc(sizeof *city1 * N);

which I prefer. The type of *city1 is char *, so sizeof *city1 == sizeof (char *). If the type of city1 ever changes, you won't have to replicate that change in the sizeof expression.

So:

city1 = malloc(sizeof *city1 * N);
city2 = malloc(sizeof *city2 * N);   

However, none of the elements in either array are pointing anywhere meaningful; you have to allocate the memory for each name, and assign the pointer accordingly:

city1[i] = malloc(sizeof *city1[i] * 10);

Since the type of city1[i] is char *, the type of *city[i] is char.

One real problem is in the structure of your loop:

city1[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
while(fscanf(data, "%s %s %d",city1[i],city2[i], &distance)!=EOF){
city1[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
city2[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
printf("%s\n%s\n%d\n", city1[i], city2[i], distance);
i++;}

Since i is 0 the first time through the loop, you wind up overwriting the pointers stored in the first two lines, meaning you lose track of the memory that you wrote the first city names into. Then you increment i, so the next time through the loop city1[i] and city2[i] are not pointing to the memory you just allocated.

You might want to reorganize your logic a bit. We need to keep track of 2 things now; how many elements we've assigned in city1 and city2, and whether we're at the end of the input file. If it were me, I'd do something like this:

for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
{
  // first, allocate memory for the current array elements
  city1[i] = malloc(...);
  city2[i] = malloc(...);
  // *then* read from the input file into those array elements
  if (fscanf(...) != EOF)
  {
    printf(...);
  }
  else
  {
    break;
  }
}

This will loop through the input file until we run past the end of our array (the condition of the for loop) or we encounter an EOF in the input stream (which will cause us to execute the break statement, exiting the loop immediately).

I think you're making life more difficult for yourself by dynamically allocating everything. For a first pass, you might just want to assume fixed sizes for your arrays. You can add more smarts later. If you know your city name lengths will never be more than 9 characters, and you know you aren't dealing with more than N cities, just declare everything statically:

char city1[N][10];
char city2[N][10];
...
while (i < N && fscanf(data, "%s %s %d\n", city1[i], city2[i], &distance) != EOF)
{
  printf("%s\n%s\n%d\n", city1[i], city2[i], distance);
}

Eventually you will want to learn how to dynamically allocate and extend arrays, but it's clear you need some practice before then. No need to run before you walk.

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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    char **city1, **city2;
    int distance,i=0;

    city1 = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*));
    city2 = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*));
    FILE* data;
    data = fopen(argv[1],"r");
     //fscanf(data, "%s %s %d", city1,city2, &distance);

    city1[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
    city2[0] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
    while(fscanf(data, "%s %s %d ",city1[i],city2[i], &distance)!=EOF){
        printf("%s\n%s\n%d\n", city1[i], city2[i], distance);
        ++i;
        city1 = (char**)realloc(city1, (i+1)*sizeof(char*));
        city2 = (char**)realloc(city2, (i+1)*sizeof(char*));
        city1[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
        city2[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*10);
    }
    fclose(data);
    {//check & free
        int j;
        for(j=0;j<i;++j){
            printf("%s\t%s\n", city1[j],city2[j]);
            free(city1[j]);free(city2[j]);
        }
        free(city1[j]);free(city2[j]);//OK?
        free(city1);free(city2);
    }
    return 0;
}
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