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I have been checking Google for an hour. I have tried using typdef but I get the same results. I am having a bit of confusion in regard to structure scopes. I'm sure it's just something silly that I'm missing.

Example, prints 0:

#include <stdio.h>
struct info
{
    int i;
};
struct info testinfo;

int test()
{

    testinfo.i = 5;
}

int main()
{
    printf("%d", testinfo.i);
}
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3  
What's your actual problem? –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jun 7 '12 at 20:21
2  
What's the question? Um also your example makes no sense. You never call the function test and you try to print an uninitialized string. –  Florin Stingaciu Jun 7 '12 at 20:22
2  
-1: No actual question. The sample code does not show anything –  eyalm Jun 7 '12 at 20:24
    
@John - I recommend that you get/read a book on C. Pay attention to local variables, scope and calling procedures. –  Ed Heal Jun 7 '12 at 20:26
    
Is that better? –  John Jun 7 '12 at 20:26
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Both struct info have block scope since you declare them as local variables. They are thus different objects. Declare only one at file scope (outside any function).

(Code in question has been edited and this answer refers to the initial bug).

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WOWOW I had no idea that's what he was trying to do until I read your answer. –  Florin Stingaciu Jun 7 '12 at 20:24
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This is unrelated to struct - you would see the same behavior with any type. What's going on is that each testinfo is in a different scope and namespace.

Also, you're never calling your function.

You could either make testinfo global, or you could pass it by pointer which is a better idea:

#include <stdio.h>

struct info
{
    char* buf;
};

int test(struct info* testinfo)
{
    testinfo->buf = "test"; // it's a bad idea to have a char* to a literal
                            // you should probably allocate new storage
}

int main()
{
    struct info testinfo;
    test(&testinfo);
    printf("%s", testinfo.buf);
}
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You will either need to pass the variable testinfo to the function test() or have test() return an info struct

Here is the first option:

int test(struct info * ti) {
  ti->buf = "test";
}
int main() {
  struct info testinfo;
  test(&testinfo);
  printf("%s", testinfo.buf);
}

Note: the * denotes a pointer to the structure, as otherwise you would copy the structure and any modifications to it would onlly occur in the copy (so main's version would not change)

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You can't do a

testinfo.buf = "test"
  1. You have to assign space for the string, buf is just a character pointer.

struct info { char buf[10]; /*10 is the space for buf*/ };

Also you should use strcpy(dest,source) when assigning strings. And also you're not calling test. Sort these two things out, you'll get the output.

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@SleepingDragon - testinfo.buf = "test" is valid. –  Ed Heal Jun 7 '12 at 20:34
    
@Ed Heal But its not advised, strcpy is a better way. I didn't say "you must", I said "you should". :) –  sleeping_dragon Jun 8 '12 at 14:25
    
@SleepingDragon - Actually you said (and I quote from above) 'You can't do a'. You can do it. It depends on what you are going to get up to with the string. It is perfectly valid. –  Ed Heal Jun 8 '12 at 15:19
    
@SleepingDragon - Who says it is not advised? Why is it not advised? –  Ed Heal Jun 8 '12 at 15:29
    
@Ed Heal: Sorry I was wrong. I overlooked that testinfo.buf was a pointer. Apologies and thanks for pointing it out. :) –  sleeping_dragon Jun 10 '12 at 17:28
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John, with the updated question you need to call test before the printf.

i.e.

int main()
{
  test();
  printf("%d", testinfo.i);
  return(0);
} 
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When you do

printf("%s", testinfo.buf);

testinfo.buf is not allocated! Try

struct info testinfo;
testinfo.buf = (char *) malloc(123);

<EDIT>

strcpy(testinfo.buf, "hello world!");

</EDIT>

printf("%s", testinfo.buf);

to get buffer allocated.

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You also need to put some null terminated string of characters into the allocated memory for it to work. –  Ed Heal Jun 7 '12 at 20:33
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