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I have a project I am working that will involve creating one DLL that will be used across multiple other sites. Inside this DLL we need to reference about 10 Enums. The values of these Enums however will be different for each site the DLL is used on. For example:

MyBase.dll may have a class MyClass with an attribute of type MyEnum.

MyBase.dll is then referenced in MySite. MyStie will also reference MyEnums.dll which will contain the values for the MyEnum type.

Is there any way to accomplish this? While building MyBase.dll, I know what enums will exist in side of MyEnums.dll. The problem is I cannot build MyBase.dll without specifically referenceing the MyEnums.dll, which is not created until the MyBase.dll is used in a specific project.

I hope that makes sense and hope I can find an answer here.

Thanks.

Edit:

Thanks for all the comments. It will take a few reads to completely understand, but let me try to give a better example of what I am looking at here.

Lets say the following code is in my DLL that will be put into various projects. Status is an enum.

public Class MyClass
{
    private Status _currentStatus;

    public Status CurrentStatus
    {
        get
        {
            return _currentStatus;
        }
    }

    public void ChangeStatus(Status newStatus)
    {
        _currentStatus = newStatus;
    }
}

What I want to be able to do is the define the possible values for Status in the individual projects. So in this DLL, I will never reference what values might be in the Status enum, I just have to know that it exists.

I hope that is a bit more clear on what I am trying to do.

share|improve this question
    
See edit to my answer. –  Danny Varod Jun 8 '12 at 1:17
    
It depends what's inside Status. Names will be fixed but values will change? In this case use a "fake" enum. Names will change (and optionally values)? Then use a dictionary with private constants. As alternative pick an opaque type (it holds a string/integer but it's another type, just to make it a little bit more type-safety). –  Adriano Repetti Jun 8 '12 at 16:11
    
Adriano...Nothing inside of Status will be fixed. in one project Status might be defined as "{ In Progress = 1, Completed = 2}" in another project it might be defined as "{ Open =1, Resolved = 2}". –  user1443233 Jun 8 '12 at 17:24
    
If you can not prevent usage of the same numbers for different enum values, you will have to use string as a key instead of int. See edit to my last example. –  Danny Varod Jun 8 '12 at 19:15
    
@user1443233 are you using VS2k10? I suggest something similar to an opaque type (to let data usable by your library) and a T4-TT to publish them to your clients. Of course it depends how much your care to type-safety (probably it's not a real problem here, a dictionary is pretty enough). –  Adriano Repetti Jun 9 '12 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

If you want each client to see different enum values (in a different assembly version), then using an enum is a bad solution - changes will break client code...

Using an enum might work (as long as the enum names and assembly name are the same and the assembly isn't signed) - you could just swap the assembly. However, if a value is used anywhere in the code that isn't there at the end you'll end up with an exception. Also, you may have the explicitly number the values, to make sure different subsets of the values won't end up with the same number for different values or different numbers for the same value.

Instead consider using a dynamically built collection, e.g. a list, a dictionary or a database table. Or just give the same assembly with the same superset of enum values to everyone and let the users decide which values are relevant to them (perhaps use significant prefixes for values as a convention).

Or you could use a combination of the two...

Generate a different structure (different type name (or namespace) and assembly name) per site with different properties (according to site's profile) and one master structure for the service that accepts the structures. Have all the structures implement the same interface, which you expect to receive...

public interface IStatus
{
    string GetKey();
}

public struct ClientXStatus : IStatus
{
    private readonly string _key;

    private ClientXStatus(string key)
    {
        _key = key;
    }

    // Don't forget default for structs is 0,
    // therefore all structs should have a "0" property.
    public ClientXStatus Default
    {
        get
        {
            return new ClientXStatus();
        }
    }

    public ClientXStatus OptionB
    {
        get
        {
            return new ClientXStatus(10);
        }
    }

    string IStatus.GetKey()
    {
        return _key;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return (obj is IStatus) && ((IStatus)obj).GetKey() == _key;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _key.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static bool operator==(ClientXStatus x, IStatus y)
    {
        return x.Equals(y);
    }

    public static bool operator==(IStatus x, ClientXStatus y)
    {
        return y.Equals(x);
    }

    public static bool operator!=(ClientXStatus x, IStatus y)
    {
        return !x.Equals(y);
    }

    public static bool operator!=(IStatus x, ClientXStatus y)
    {
        return !y.Equals(x);
    }

    // Override Equals(), GetHashCode() and operators ==, !=
    // So clients can compare structures to each other (to interface)
}

Use a master struct for the service:

public struct MasterStatus : IStatus
{
    private readonly string _key;

    private MasterStatus(string key)
    {
        _key = key;
    }

    // Don't forget default for structs is 0,
    // therefore all structs should have a "0" property.
    public MasterStatus Default
    {
        get
        {
            return new MasterStatus();
        }
    }

    // You should have all the options here
    public MasterStatus OptionB
    {
        get
        {
            return new MasterStatus(10);
        }
    }

    // Here use implicit interface implementation instead of explicit implementation
    public string GetKey()
    {
        return _key;
    }

    public static implicit operator MasterStatus(IStatus value)
    {
        return new MasterStatus(value.GetKey());
    }

    public static implicit operator string(MasterStatus value)
    {
        return new value._key;
    }

    // Don't forget to implement Equals, GetHashCode,
    // == and != like in the client structures
}

Demo service code:

public void ServiceMethod(IStatus status)
{
    switch (status.GetKey())
    {
        case (string)MasterStructA.OptionB:
            DoSomething();
    }
}

Or:

public void ChangeStatus(IStatus status)
{
    _status = (MasterStatus)status;
}

This way you:

  1. Use code generation to prevent collision of values.

  2. Force users to use compile time checks (no int values or string values) by hiding values (as private) and only accepting your structures.

  3. Use real polymorphism in the service's code (an interface) and not a error-prone hack.

  4. Use immutable value types (like enums) and not reference types.

share|improve this answer
    
Side question: as @David pointed out many projects use an approach base class + properties because of static checking. Why we don't have a dictionary, for example, of colors in the framework? Why StringComparer is implemented with this approach? Hard-coding strings is tedious and error-prone. –  Adriano Repetti Jun 7 '12 at 22:14
    
The list of Colors doesn't change between locations. If you want colors that aren't in the list, you use... a string e.g. "#ff0080" or numbers e.g. 255, 0, 0x80. Using different static information in the same structure in different versions is worse than hard coding strings. (Something which I do avoid doing when possible.) –  Danny Varod Jun 7 '12 at 22:45
    
@Adriano I added an alternative approach I once used (for a different kind of problem). It is both static and hack-free (and it prevents users from providing wrong int too). –  Danny Varod Jun 8 '12 at 1:23
1  
I understand what you mean (after one day...LOL). It depends what he means with "values". If values can change (but names don't) then I do not appreciate the dictionary at all. If both names and values can change then my solution isn't viable at all so the dictionary (or something more complicated) is the only way. In that case we may even argue why he didn't use more than one enum... :) –  Adriano Repetti Jun 8 '12 at 11:26
1  
@Adriano LOL finally! I understood that each client gets a different subset of the enum values (by that I mean the names) and warned that he must make sure that the mapping to int must be 1:1 with the name through out all the clients. –  Danny Varod Jun 8 '12 at 11:37

First you have to decide WHERE to put your constants. Then you can transform your enum to static properties.

For example:

public enum MyEnum
{
    Value1,
    Value2
}

Can be changed to (first naive approach):

public static class MyFakeEnum
{
    public static int Value1
    {
        get { return GetActualValue("Value1"); }
    }

    public static int Value2
    {
        get { return GetActualValue("Value2"); }
    }

    private static int GetActualValue(string name)
    {
        // Put here the code to read the actual value
        // from your favorite source. It can be a database, a configuration
        // file, the registry or whatever else. Consider to cache the result.
    }
}

This simply will provide required constants but you'll have to throw away compile-time check for the type if you'll need MyFakeEnum as parameter. For a better solution you can follow, for example, what Microsoft did (more or less) for System.Drawing.Color.

public sealed class MyFakeEnum
{
    public static readonly MyFakeEnum Value1 = new MyFakeEnum("Value1");
    public static readonly MyFakeEnum Value2 = new MyFakeEnum("Value2");

    private MyFakeEnum(string name)
    {
        _name = name;
    }

    public static implicit operator int(MyFakeEnum value)
    {
        return GetActualValue(value._name);
    }

    private string _name;
}

Of course you should provide proper overides at least for Equals, GetHashCode and ToString.

Pro

  • It can be an upgrade from an existing enum. Code won't be breaked and you may just need to recompile.
  • You can use it as strongly typed parameter. For example: void DoSomething(MyFakeEnum value) is valid and callers can't pass something else (note that this is one of the reasons because enums are considered weak).
  • If you implement all the required operators you can use the normal syntax for comparison: value == MyFakeEnum::Value1.
  • With a little bit of code you may even implement the FlagsAttribute syntax.
  • You do not change the normal syntax of enums: MyFakeEnum.Value1.
  • You can implement any number of implicit/explicit conversion operators to/from your type and any conversion will be safe and checked in the point it's done (this is not true again with standard enums).
  • You do not have hard-coded strings that can be breaked by changes and won't be catched until they cause a run-time error (yes, run-time). Using, for example, a dictionary if you'll change the definitions then you'll have to search all your code for that string.

Cons

  • First implementation is longer because you have to write support code (but for any new value you'll simply add a new line).
  • Value list is fixed and must be known at compile time (this is not an issue if you're searching a replacement for an enum because it's fixed too).

With this solution you may save more or less the same syntax you had with standard enums.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't agree with your solution, however, at least now it will compile (added missing types). –  Danny Varod Jun 7 '12 at 21:23
    
@DannyVarod yes, first example is pretty naive! I was still editing the answer to provide more options anyway thank you, I did eat "int" in the declarations! –  Adriano Repetti Jun 7 '12 at 21:30
    
There is actually an open-source project named Tarantino that uses this approach -- see here. –  David Jun 7 '12 at 21:36
    
@David nice project, they even provide some of the "standard" Enum functions. It's a very common technique starting from the framework itself (enums are pretty weak) so I guess many projects use it. –  Adriano Repetti Jun 7 '12 at 21:44
    
Using a dictionary would give the same functionality (string --> int) without writing a property for each value. (You could wrap it with a class that initializes the values either hardcoded or from a config file/DB) and has an indexer property... see update to my answer for details. –  Danny Varod Jun 7 '12 at 21:49

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