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I am attempting to solve Project Euler's tenth question, but for some reason I can't get it right. I'm really new at programming and Java, so I can't understand why it isn't working. The point of the question is to find the sum of all the primes below 2,000,000. Help!

/*  The sum of the primes below 10 is 2 + 3 + 5 + 7 = 17.

    Find the sum of all the primes below two million.
*/  

public static void main(String[] args){

    long n = 1;
    long sum = 0;
    long limit;

    System.out.println("Enter the limit of n: ");
    limit = TextIO.getlnLong(); //TextIO is another input method
    while (limit <= 0){
        System.out.println("Enter the limit of n (must be positive): ");
        limit = TextIO.getlnLong();

    }


    while (n < limit){ 
        n++;
        if (n % 2 != 0 && n % 3 != 0 && n % 5 != 0 && n % 7 != 0 && n != 1 || n == 2 || n == 3 || n == 5 || n == 7){ //this is my prime checking method, might be flawed

            sum = sum + n;  
            System.out.println(+sum);
        } //end if

    }//end while

    System.out.println("The sum of the primes below 2,000,000 is: " +sum);

} //end of main
share|improve this question
9  
Your prime checking method is certainly flawed. –  Junuxx Jun 7 '12 at 21:38
    
121 is prime... –  CodesInChaos Jun 7 '12 at 21:38
    
I also recommend factoring the prime checking out into a separate method. –  CodesInChaos Jun 7 '12 at 21:39
    
Here's a proven Sieve you can use. –  OldCurmudgeon Jun 7 '12 at 23:42
1  
121 = 11*11. That's not prime....perfect square, yes. –  duffymo Jun 7 '12 at 23:58

3 Answers 3

For an efficient prime checking method, read up on the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

share|improve this answer
    
For numbers up to 2 million he certainly doesn't need something overly efficient. I expect the naive implementation to take a couple of seconds. –  CodesInChaos Jun 7 '12 at 21:42
2  
@CodeInChaos: Maybe, but bruteforcing stuff generally isn't in the spirit of projecteuler, and he'll definitely need something efficient for later prime-related problems. –  Junuxx Jun 7 '12 at 21:44
    
The Sieve would require some kind of set, list, or vector to handle the increasing set of primes found. Nested for loops and dynamically sized data structures big be too much for zsherman at the moment –  JustinDanielson Jun 7 '12 at 22:05
    
this method is so interesting. learned new. –  kitokid Jun 8 '12 at 8:35
1  
@JustinDanielson The sieve itself indicates whether each number is a prime, no need to store the numbers outside the sieve. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 8 '12 at 19:46

Your prime method is broken. A number is prime if it does not have any divisors between 2 and the square root of the number. 13*13 would pass your prime check function.

for i to sqrt(n):
   if(n % i == 0):
       OH NO NOT PRIME DO SOMETHING HERE?
if something is prime
   add some stuff
share|improve this answer
public static void main(String args[])
{
  long n = 1;
  long sum = 0;
  long limit=Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

  while (n < limit)
  {
    n++;
    if(n % 2 != 0 && n % 3 != 0 && n % 5 != 0 && n % 7 != 0 && n != 1 || n == 2 || n == 3 || n == 5 || n == 7)
    {
      sum = sum + n;
    }
  }


    System.out.println("The sum of the prime numbers = " +sum);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
this works!!!!!!try it...... –  priyadarshni koparde Nov 2 '12 at 17:55
2  
Could you add some text that describes how this answers the question? –  Chris Gerken Nov 2 '12 at 18:15
    
Ditto. Explanations are always appreciated. Otherwise you leave everyone with the task of playing spot-the-difference –  Sheena Nov 2 '12 at 18:18
    
here n is starting number and limit is range which can be 2000000. while loop is used to check numbers upto the limit. now inside the loop each number will be checked for prime or not with the help of given if condition. if its a prime num, it will be added to sum. finally all prime numbers will be added to sum and sum is printed. –  priyadarshni koparde Nov 2 '12 at 18:25
    
is this helpful??? –  priyadarshni koparde Nov 2 '12 at 18:30

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