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I recently started with F# and implemented a very basic recursive function that represents the Sieve of Eratosthenes. I came up with the following, working code:

static member internal SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive sequence accumulator =
    match sequence with
    | [] -> accumulator
    | head::tail -> let rest = tail |> List.filter(fun number -> number % head <> 0L)
                    let newAccumulator = head::accumulator
                    Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive rest newAccumulator

This function is not really memory efficient so I tried to eliminate the variables "rest" and "newAccumulator". I came up with the following code

static member internal SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive sequence accumulator =
    match sequence with
    | [] -> accumulator
    | head::tail -> tail    |> List.filter(fun number -> number % head <> 0L) 
                            |> Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive (head::accumulator)

As far as I understand the tutorials I've read Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive will be called with the filtered tail as first parameter and a list consisting of head::accumulator as second one. However when I try to run the code with the reduced variable usage, the program gets trappen in an infinite loop. Why is this happening and what did I do wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I understand the tutorials I've read Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive will be called with the filtered tail as first parameter and a list consisting of head::accumulator as second one.

You have this backwards.

In the first version, you're passing rest then newAccumulator; in the second version, you're effectively passing newAccumulator then rest. I.e., you've transposed the arguments.

Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive (head::accumulator) is a partial function application wherein you're applying (head::accumulator) as the first argument (sequence). This partial function application yields a unary function (expecting accumulator), to which you are passing (via |>) what is called rest in the first version of your code.

Changing SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive's argument order is the easiest solution, but I would consider something like the following idiomatic as well:

static member internal SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive sequence accumulator =
    match sequence with
    | [] -> accumulator
    | head::tail ->
        tail
        |> List.filter(fun number -> number % head <> 0L) 
        |> Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive <| (head::accumulator)

or

static member internal SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive sequence accumulator =
    let inline flipzip a b = b, a
    match sequence with
    | [] -> accumulator
    | head::tail ->
        tail
        |> List.filter(fun number -> number % head <> 0L) 
        |> flipzip (head::accumulator)
        ||> Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive

FWIW, eliminating rest and newAccumulator as named variables here is not going to impact your memory usage in the slightest.

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You are right. Thanks for pointing that out. The pipelined parameter will be passed in as last parameter –  ChrisK Jun 7 '12 at 22:16

The last call in your second function is equivalent to:

Prime.SieveOfEratosthenesRecursive newAccumulator rest

where you switch positions of two params. Since newAccumulator grows bigger after each recursive call, you will never reach the base case of empty list.

The rule of thumb is putting the most frequently changing parameter at last:

let rec sieve acc xs =
    match xs with
    | [] -> acc
    | x::xs' -> xs' |> List.filter (fun y -> y % x <> 0L) 
                    |> sieve (x::acc)

The above function could be shortened using function keyword:

let rec sieve acc = function
    | [] -> acc
    | x::xs' -> xs' |> List.filter (fun y -> y % x <> 0L) 
                    |> sieve (x::acc)

Using pipe (|>) operator only makes the function more readable, it doesn't affect memory usage at all.

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