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I'm trying to track down a new null pointer exception which is appearing in my ACRA logs and which I can't reproduce. Here's the relevant code:

public class MyApplication extends Application {
   public void onCreate() {
       DataManager.instance().initializeData(this);
   }
}

public class DataManager {
    private static DataManger instance = new DataManger();
    private List<DataModel> dataModels;
    private List<I_Callback> callbacks = new ArrayList<I_Callback>();
    private boolean isInitialized = false;

    private DataManager(){}

    public static DataManager instance() {
       return instance;
    }

    public void initializeData(Context context) {
        new DataManagerInitializer().execute(context);
    }

    public void setDataModels(List<DataModel> models) {
        dataModels = models;
    }

    public void synchronized registerInitializeCallbacks(I_Callback callback) {
        if (isInitialized) {
             callback.executeCallback();
        } else {
             callbacks.add(callback);
        }
    }

    public void synchronized setInitialized() {
        isInitialized = true;
        for (I_Callback callback:callbacks) {
             callback.executeCallback();
        }
        callbacks.clear();
    }
}

public class DataManagerInitializer extends AsyncTask<Context, Void, Void>{
    protected Void doInBackground(Context... contexts){
        List<DataModel> dataModels = new ArrayList<DataModel>();
        /*various code to create DataModel objects and add to dataModels list*/
        DataManager.instance().setDataModels(dataModels);
        return null;
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Void result) {
        DataManager.instance().setInitialized();
    }
}

public class ActivityA extends Activity implements I_Callback{
     public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        setContentView(R.layout.graphical_layout);
        DataManager.instance().registerInitializeCallbacks(this);
     }

     public void executeCallback() {
        /* wire up button to call Activity B */
     }
}

public class ActivityB extends Activity {
     public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
         List<DataModel> dataModels = DataManager.instance().getDataModels();

         /* The following line of code throws a null pointer exception 
            in the stack trace*/
         for (int i=0; i < dataModels.size(); i++){
              /* do something with the data model */
         }
     }
}

To break down the above more simply, the application is launched which kicks off the initializion of the data manager singleton. ActivityA, the main activity, launches and waits for the data manager to complete initialization before allowing any actions, wiring up any events, etc. From ActivityA, its not possible to get to ActivityB without the call back method executing and ActivityB is only reachable from ActivityA. The only way for the list of data models to be null in the DataManager is for it to not have been initialized, but I'm struggling to see how this is possible. Any suggestions on how my null pointer may have occurred?

share|improve this question
1  
Is DataManger a typo? Weird one if it is--you didn't type all that in by hand, did you?! – Dave Newton Jun 7 '12 at 23:02
    
Yes, this was all typed by hand. Apologies for the typo – Chris Knight Jun 8 '12 at 9:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's assume that:

you are interacting with the Activity B

press the home button:

start playing with other apps (consuming memory)

at some point the so needs memory and it's gonna start garbage collecting objects, included your "instance".

If that happens when you launch your app the framework will resume the activity B and the npe will happen.

You need to re-create the instance (in the activity B) if it is null.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. However, wouldn't it need to be a pretty serious situation to get into where a static refernce is garbace collected as this would require the garbage collection of the class (holding the static refence) as well as the class loader holding the refrence to the class? – Chris Knight Jun 8 '12 at 11:05
    
I hear you. The fact is that if the system needs memory, the activty A and eventually B get destroyed (according to the references chain). The class loader is certainly treated differently. – gwa Jun 8 '12 at 16:28
private static DataManger instance = new DataManger();

...


public static DataManager instance() {
   return instance;
}

Is where the problem is. So your instance variable is getting garbage collected. As it is instantiated when it is declared, it is not being appropriately re-instantiated. So, try this instead:

private static DataManger instance = null;

...


public static DataManager instance() {
    if (instance == null){
        instance = new DataManager();
    } 
    return instance;
}

This will ensure the call to instance() (usually called getInstance() but this is only convention), will return a valid single instance of the datamanager. Try to avoid instantiating global variables with their declaration, to avoid this specific problem.

share|improve this answer
    
"usually called getInstance() but this is only convention" - Yes, but in the case of the OP's code, I can see a good reason for 'convention'. Having a private static field and a public static method with the same name is going to get confusing at some point. ;) – Squonk Jun 7 '12 at 23:09
    
@Squonk just change ur constructor's visibility to private and nothing will be confusing at any point. You can only instantiate your class with a static Class.getInstance() call, which perfectly makes sense in modern software – Sherif elKhatib Jun 7 '12 at 23:50
    
@SherifelKhatib : I meant when reading the code at some point afterwards. In a project involving multiple developers (for example), using 'convention' is absolutely essential. Even developing code as a solo developer, it takes me time to remember how certain code works if I haven't looked at it for several months. I follow convention just so I can be sure I understand what I wrote the first time around. – Squonk Jun 7 '12 at 23:54
    
@Squonk !! my fault sorry – Sherif elKhatib Jun 8 '12 at 0:04
    
@SherifelKhatib : No problem, I can see where you're coming from. Sometimes when I read code people post in questions here I think..."Ouch, that's gonna bite you at some point". :) – Squonk Jun 8 '12 at 0:13

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