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If I have a class:

class A{
public:
    A();
    void print();
private:
    int value;
};

A::A() {value = 0;}
void A::print() {cout << value << endl;}

What is the complete name of the :: symbol in the last 2 lines?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's called the scope resolution operator.

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Do at least you understand this rating? –  leftaroundabout Jun 8 '12 at 12:56
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It's called scope resolution operator.


You'd like to know what you could write instead of ::? Well, there is no alternative that always works. For your example, it is possible to just define those member functions in the body of your class, that would be the inline-style of defining a class:

class A{
  int value;
 public:
  A() {
    value = 0;
  }
  void print() {
    cout << value << endl;
  }
};

That way, you obviously have no way to put the definition in a different file, so it's not possible to compile them separately.

At other times, when :: is used to resolve a namespace rather than a class, you can replace that with either reopening that namespace or pulling it into scope with using namespace.

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How about #define SCOPE ::? ;) –  FredOverflow Jun 8 '12 at 9:17
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What is the complete name of the :: symbol in the last 2 lines?

It's "scope resolution operator".

Does anyone know the answer?

Yes.

Is this the weirdest question you ever been asked?

No.

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2  
I like this answer very much. –  mathematician1975 Jun 7 '12 at 23:07
2  
Upvotes ensue!! –  Drise Jun 7 '12 at 23:07
2  
On the downside, and with exceptionally poor timing, while you were typing this I edited the superfluous copy out of the question! –  razlebe Jun 7 '12 at 23:10
1  
It would be great if you put it back again. –  mathematician1975 Jun 7 '12 at 23:11
3  
This is how to answer a question with style. –  Marlon Jun 7 '12 at 23:11
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