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I'm a beginner at Python and I'm getting a strange out of bounds error.

The idea is that I need a cache initialized using:

arr = [0]*1000000

then accessed in the same function by calling

def func (i) :
    k=1
    a = i
    arr = [0]*1000000
    while (i>1):    
        if arr[i] != 0:
            k = k + arr[i] - 1
            break
        if i%2 == 0:
            i = i/2
        else:
            i = 3*i + 1
        k += 1
    arr[a] = k
    return k

if the value i is over 1500 it gives me an out of bounds error. The cache, however, is supposed to be initialized to a million ints. Am I missing something? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
k, a, and i aren't mentioned explicitly before you loop. Could you post some more code, such that it includes the initialization of those variables? –  Makoto Jun 8 '12 at 0:45
    
sorry, added a more complete code –  Harrison He Jun 8 '12 at 0:52
    
eventually the array will be passed in as a param, but I initialized it in the function to eliminate any other causes for the error –  Harrison He Jun 8 '12 at 0:54
1  
The Collatz conjecture eh? Pre-initializing an array here is a waste of memory (and time). Is this a memoization attempt? –  Joel Cornett Jun 8 '12 at 0:56
1  
If you want the memoization to do any good, you need to keep the data between calls to the function. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 8 '12 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Updated now that the code is posted:

I don't seem to get any problems up to 1500. I do get an IndexError for func(1819), for which the i evolution begins

1819
5458
2729

and winds up at

851290
425645
1276936
[...]
IndexError: list index out of range

but that's not a bug, that's simply a fact that it goes higher than you made room for. You could use a dictionary instead of a list to avoid this problem.

--

To be clear, here's the sort of thing I had in mind:

def func_with_dict(i) :
    k=1
    a = i
    arr = {}
    while (i>1):    
        print i
        if i in arr:
            k = k + arr[i] - 1
            break
        if i%2 == 0:
            i = i/2
        else:
            i = 3*i + 1
        k += 1
        arr[a] = k
    return k

which produces

1819
5458
2729
8188
[...]
851290
425645
1276936
638468
319234
[...]
20
10
5
16
8
4
2

and a final answer of 162. I don't think I'd use arr this way myself, though, but what I would do depends upon what you're trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
k isn't exactly explicitly mentioned, either... and we're assuming that i is initialized to 2 or greater. –  Makoto Jun 8 '12 at 0:44
    
i will be in the range of 1 to 1000000 –  Harrison He Jun 8 '12 at 0:52
1  
@HarrisonHe: only collatz sequences of i = 2**k are guaranteed to remain below i. i = 3 for example, goes up to 16 before going back down to 1. –  Joel Cornett Jun 8 '12 at 1:09
    
hmm how do you go about initializing a dictionary to a million values? I'm also not fully understanding the list structure –  Harrison He Jun 8 '12 at 1:14
    
@HarrisonHe: You don't, you add the values as they come up. –  Joel Cornett Jun 8 '12 at 1:16

This function can grow arbitrarily before it eventually collapses.

You're probably just hitting some number that makes it grow faster than it collapses for a while. If you put in 1 more or one less than what you're passing in you probably won't hit the problem.

If you really want to cache the results, dicts are more appropriate than lists for sparse arrays in Python.

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