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In order to draw decals I'm currently making use of glPolygonOffset(-1,-1), this rids me of some ugly z-fighting artifacts when I'm drawing my decals by fudging the zbuffer values of the decal as if the decal's polygons were closer to the camera. I also thought that I would be able to use glPolygonOffset with various argumets to order the decals relative to eachother, but this seems to adjust based upon the cameras angle, thus entire decals end up swapping order with each other when I move the camera around.

Another approach that I've played with is here in this document under : "Making Decals"

  1. Disable the depth buffer for writing, and render A.
  2. Enable the depth buffer for writing, and render B.
  3. Disable the color buffer for writing, and render A again.
  4. Enable the color buffer for writing.

Here's my attempt at this but I don't really understand how this could be extended to draw the decals in order relative to each other, since the decals are drawn when the depth buffer is enabled for writing, won't I just get more z fighting?

glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);  
glEnable(GL_BLEND);

//Render a red solid quad on the color mask
glDepthMask(false);
glColor3f (1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glBegin (GL_QUADS);
    glVertex2f(-1,-1);
    glVertex2f(-1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,-1);
glEnd ();

//Render the coincident decal, a transparent square works fine for now
glDepthMask(true);
glColor4f(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.5f);
glTranslatef(0, 1, 0.0f);
glScalef(0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f);
glBegin (GL_QUADS);
    glVertex2f(-1,-1);
    glVertex2f(-1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,-1);
glEnd ();

//Render the red quad again but only on the depth buffer
glColorMask(false, false, false, false);
glLoadIdentity();
glColor3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glBegin (GL_QUADS);
    glVertex2f(-1,-1);
    glVertex2f(-1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,1);
    glVertex2f(1,-1);
glEnd ();
glColorMask(true, true, true, true);

This is something that seems to be done in most games so I'm sure there's much better solution I'm missing. However, I've done a lot of searching, and haven't been able to come up with any tutorials for ordering decals like this in openGL. Maybe I'm just using the wrong search terms? Is there another name for this process?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using glPolygonOffset as you suggested and rendering things front-to-back is likely to give better performance than other options as it should make the most of "early Z" optimisations in the GPU.

You might want to try passing larger numbers to glPolygonOffset, eg (-4, -4) for the first decal, (-8, -8) for the second, etc -- it's not an exact science ;)

Of course, there's a limit to how many decals you can draw in this fashion before your glPolygonOffset gets so large your decals appear in front of things they're not supposed to.

Re The camera angle thing: the factor argument to glPolygonOffset is supposed to add extra fudge for highly angled polygons.

Another method you could try is:

  • Render all regular geometry as normal
  • Disable depth writes (but leave the depth test enabled)
  • glPolygonOffset(-1, -1)
  • Draw all decals, from back to front

And another, possibly more efficient, method:

  • Clear the stencil buffer to 0 at the start of the frame (at the same time you clear the other buffers)
  • Render all regular geometry as normal
  • Disable depth writes (but leave the depth test enabled)
  • glPolygonOffset(-1, -1)
  • glStencilFunc(GL_NOTEQUAL, 1, 1), glStencilOp(GL_KEEP, GL_KEEP, GL_REPLACE)
  • Draw all decals, from front to back
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Regarding the first (4-point) method you listed: Won't enabling the depth test result in z-fighting between decals here, and essentially make the rendering order irrelevant? Or am I misunderstanding how the depth test works? –  Lockyer Jun 11 '12 at 13:43
    
I couldn't get glPolygon offset to work by using larger values, I don't know what sort of equation it uses to deal with highly angled polygons, but I don't think it's really meant to be stacked in that fashion. After thinking about that (4-point) method you posted a bit more, I think it has the potential to work. I'll try it out and post here with the results. –  Lockyer Jun 11 '12 at 13:58
    
@Lockyer Depth test and depth write are separate enables. If you just have the depth test enabled, occluded pixels will still be discarded (which we want), but the z buffer won't be updated, so you won't get z-fighting with later decals –  dave Jun 11 '12 at 19:39
    
@Lockyer glPolygonOffset ought to be "stackable": see eg idevgames.com/forums/thread-5474.html. It's possible that your GPU/driver has a dodgy implementation –  dave Jun 11 '12 at 19:53
    
Thanks for elaborating dave, I think I understand what it's doing now, and it worked perfectly in my tests. Yeah it's odd that stacking glPolygonOffset didn't work for me, I'm running on a ATI Radeon HD 4670. However I think your (4-point) method is more flexible anyways. –  Lockyer Jun 12 '12 at 12:25

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