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How to get the current date value in epoch i.e., number of days elapsed since 1970-1-1. I need solution in unix shell script.

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That depends on the language. Which language do you use? – Stephan202 Jul 7 '09 at 19:26
    
What language or technology are you using? – Thomas Owens Jul 7 '09 at 19:26
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Are you sure you want the number of days since epoch? The answers so far give you seconds :) you'll need to divide that by 60 * 60 * 24 to get your answer :) – Jeremy Smyth Jul 7 '09 at 19:29
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thanks to all... but my system is not recognizing the +%s format specifier, am not getting the result :( – Krishna Jul 7 '09 at 19:34
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What kind of system are you on, then? Anyway, give the solution I posted below a try. Perhaps that script is more portable... – Stephan202 Jul 7 '09 at 19:54
up vote -3 down vote accepted

Update: The answer previously posted here linked to a custom script that is no longer available, solely because the OP indicated that date +'%s' didn't work for him. Please see UberAlex' answer and cadrian's answer for proper solutions. In short:

  1. For the number of seconds since the Unix epoch use date(1) as follows:

    date +'%s'
    
  2. For the number of days since the Unix epoch divide the result by the number of seconds in a day (mind the double parentheses!):

    echo $(($(date +%s) / 60 / 60 / 24))
    
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It works... thanks a lot. – Krishna Jul 7 '09 at 20:29
    
You're welcome :) – Stephan202 Jul 7 '09 at 20:41
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This is not the best answer, and no longer useful at all, as the links are broken. It should be a one liner, as below. – Sam Watkins Oct 23 '13 at 0:59
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@SamWatkins: Very much agreed. Unfortunately accepted answers cannot be deleted. – Stephan202 Oct 23 '13 at 12:44
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@alancnet: the answer was not incorrect for the OP, but he did have a very weird setup indeed. Anyway, I had enough of all the downvotes, so I rewrote the answer to something that is useful for the other 99.9999% of the planet. – Stephan202 Apr 14 at 6:35
echo `date +%s`/86400 | bc
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1  
Not all days have 86400 seconds (DST, leap seconds, etc...) – Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 8:20
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but every 'unix day' has 86400 seconds – Sam Watkins Oct 23 '13 at 0:52

The Unix Date command will display in epoch time

the command is

date +"%s"

http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?date

Edit: Some people have observed you asked for days, so it's the result of that command divided by 86,400

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4  
Note that %s is an extension. POSIX date does not have %s. See pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/date.html for details. – Jens Sep 1 '11 at 8:04
    
Not all days have 86400 seconds (DST, leap seconds, etc...) – Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 8:19
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Again, in unix time (date +%s) each day has 86400 "seconds", it does not include leap seconds and certainly not DST. The answer is correct. – Sam Watkins Oct 23 '13 at 0:57
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Why oh why is this not the accepted answer? – jameshfisher Dec 10 '13 at 21:56
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Is it possible to display the milliseconds since the epoch? – Daniel Pendergast Sep 6 '15 at 0:51
echo $(($(date +%s) / 60 / 60 / 24))
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+1 Should work on most bourne shells and unixes – nos Jul 7 '09 at 19:52
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Note that %s is an extension. POSIX date does not have %s. See pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/date.html for details. – Jens Sep 1 '11 at 8:05
1  
Not all days have 86400 (60*60*24) seconds (DST, leap seconds, etc...) – Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 8:19
2  
Unix time does have 86400 seconds per day exactly. Note, if using with -d for a specific date, suggest -u for UTC, or answer will vary by timezone. echo $(( $(date -u -d '2014-01-01' +%s) / 86400 )) – Sam Watkins Oct 23 '13 at 0:56

Depending on the language you're using it's going to be something simple like

CInt(CDate("1970-1-1") - CDate(Today()))

Ironically enough, yesterday was day 40,000 if you use 1/1/1900 as "day zero" like many computer systems use.

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That looks like VB to me. The question asks in relation to a Unix shell script. – Noldorin Jul 7 '09 at 19:32
    
He edited it after I answered. Thanks for your input anyway. – mandroid Jul 7 '09 at 20:01
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Why is it ironic? – jameshfisher Dec 10 '13 at 21:54
    
because Warhammer 40,000. – w00t Oct 19 '15 at 10:49

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