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I use a simple pipe. I read with a while, 1 char at a time, I think every time I read a char I overwrite something

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <string.h>

int main () {
    int pipefd[2];
    int cpid;
    char buf[31];
    if (pipe(pipefd) == -1) {
        perror("pipe");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    cpid = fork();
    if (cpid == -1) {
        perror("cpid");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    if (cpid == 0) {      // child reads from pipe
        close (pipefd[1]); // close unused write end
        int i = 0;
        while (read (pipefd[0], &(buf[i++]), 1)>0);
        printf ("Server receives: %s", buf);
        close (pipefd[0]);
        exit (EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
    else {               // parent writes to pipe
        close (pipefd[0]); // closing unused read end;
        char buf2[30];
        printf("Server transmits: ");
        scanf ("%s", buf2);
        write (pipefd[1], buf2, strlen(buf2)+1);
        close(pipefd[1]);
        wait(NULL);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
  return 0;
}

Code is now fixed, this is obsolete: For example, if I input: "Flowers" it prints F and then ~6 unprintable characters

BUT: A small odd thing that's happening, I just used a string way longer than 30, and it produced no error at all, and it did manage to write the entire string. Though both my buffers are considerably smaller than that.

share|improve this question
    
There are a few typos in here, just a heads up -- Random line endings, etc. –  jedwards Jun 8 '12 at 4:52
    
Also, what compiler are you using? With GCC 4.6.3 I get no output, regardless of what I type in to the prompt. –  jedwards Jun 8 '12 at 4:54
    
Gcc 4.6.1 and @jedwards I use a virtual machiene, so I can't copy paste. Whatever typos are here, are not in the code I use srry about that. –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 5:02
1  
When using a string longer than 30, you invoke undefined behavior. It could work, it could crash, and it could be what initiates the robot rebellion. –  Dave Jun 8 '12 at 5:24
    
@Dave Epic comment :) also thank you. I have never seen this in c++ and my time with c has been short. –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 5:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(Following Anders' suggestion.)

Using GCC 4.6.3, my code:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <string.h>

int main () {
    int pipefd[2];
    int cpid;
    char buf[31];
    if (pipe(pipefd) == -1) {
        perror("pipe");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    cpid = fork();
    if (cpid == -1)
    {
        perror("cpid");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    if (cpid == 0) {      // child reads from pipe
        close (pipefd[1]); // close unused write end
        int i=0;
        while (read(pipefd[0], &(buf[i++]), 1) != 0);
        printf ("Server receives: %s\n", buf);
        close (pipefd[0]);
        exit (EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
    else {               // parent writes to pipe
        close (pipefd[0]); // closing unused read end;
        char buf2[30];
        printf("Server transmits: ");
        scanf ("%s", buf2);
        write (pipefd[1], buf2, strlen(buf2)+1);
        close(pipefd[1]);
        wait(NULL);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
  return 0;
}

Produces:

[user@host tmp]$ gcc pipes.c -o pipes && ./pipes 
Server transmits: Flowers
Server receives: Flowers

(I also agree with his sentiment about bounds checking.)


EDIT: Per your comment, if you change the following line (35 for me)

scanf("%s", buf2);

to

fgets(buf2, 30, stdin);

You gain two benefits. (a) You eliminate a buffer overflow vulnerability by limiting the number of bytes that will be copied into buf2. (b) You are able to "accept" non-newline whitespace (spaces and tabs) whereas with scanf, you were not:

[user@host tmp]$ gcc pipes.c -o pipes && ./pipes 
Server transmits: Flowers smell nice
Server receives: Flowers smell nice
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to have worked. Only real modification was ` &(buf[i++])` but it seems to have done the trick, thank you! But it only reads one word (EX: Flowers smell nice outputs: Flowers). Any idea why ? –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 5:08
    
The scanf() function will "stop" at the first whitespace (space, tab, new-line, etc.) You might consider something like fgets() instead. I'll update my answer with an example using fgets(). –  jedwards Jun 8 '12 at 5:21
    
Ok, that solves everything now, thank you! –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 5:38
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this here doesnt look right

while (read (pipefd[0], &buf, 1)>0);

you read over and over again a character into the first position of the buffer

instead you should increment the position where you put the read character

e.g.

int i = 0;
while (read(pipefd[0], buf + i, 1) >0 ) ++i;
buf[i] = 0; // end string

probably good also to check that doesn't become larger than buf size.

while (read(pipefd[0], buf + i, 1) >0 && i < sizeof(buf)) ++i;
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, same result –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 4:45
    
Nope, same result. EDIT: I'm about to give up on the while. I decided to print i and change from sizeof (buf) to strlen(buf); sizeof was going too high. Still no improvement though (now i goes trough buff but buff remains first character and a string of unprintable characters) –  Kalec Jun 8 '12 at 4:52
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