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I need to make a function to take in an array of numbers and a target number and return how many different ways you can add or subtract those numbers to get the target number.

ie.

Values = 2, 4, 6, 8 Target = 12

2 + 4 + 6 = 12,

4 + 8 = 12,

6 + 8 - 2 = 12,

2 - 4 + 6 + 8 = 12,

Return 4

Here is what I have so far, but it only counts addition problems.

private void RecursiveSolve(int goal, int currentSum, List<int> included, List<int> notIncluded, int startIndex) 
{
    for (int index = startIndex; index < notIncluded.Count; index++) 
    {
        int nextValue = notIncluded[index];
        if (currentSum + nextValue == goal)
        {
            List<int> newResult = new List<int>(included);
            newResult.Add(nextValue);
            mResults.Add(newResult);
        }
        else if (currentSum - nextValue == goal)
        {
            List<int> newResult = new List<int>(included);
            newResult.Add(nextValue);
            mResults.Add(newResult);
        }

        if (currentSum - nextValue < goal && currentSum - nextValue > 0 )
        {
            List<int> nextIncluded = new List<int>(included);
            nextIncluded.Add(nextValue);
            List<int> nextNotIncluded = new List<int>(notIncluded);
            nextNotIncluded.Remove(nextValue);
            RecursiveSolve(goal, currentSum - nextValue, nextIncluded, nextNotIncluded, startIndex++);
        }

        if (currentSum + nextValue < goal)
        {
            List<int> nextIncluded = new List<int>(included);
            nextIncluded.Add(nextValue);
            List<int> nextNotIncluded = new List<int>(notIncluded);
            nextNotIncluded.Remove(nextValue);
            RecursiveSolve(goal, currentSum + nextValue, nextIncluded, nextNotIncluded, startIndex++);
        }
    }
}
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Can't you just handle subtraction by changing the list {2,4,6} to {2,4,6,-2,-4,-6} ? –  High Performance Mark Jun 8 '12 at 8:39
    
That is an interesting idea. I'll look into that. –  Timothy Massing Jun 8 '12 at 16:05

1 Answer 1

Well, the simple way would be to try all of the combinations. If you have N numbers, you have 3^N combinations. The reasoning is this: You sum the numbers but put a coefficient in front of each of them. If your numbers are A1..AN, you add N coefficients (C1..CN) and sum:

Sum (Ai*Ci)

Your Cis can be 1 (meaning you add the number), -1 (meaning you subtract the number) or 0 (meaning you ignore the number).

So, go over all 3^N possible coefficient assignments, calculate the sum and compare to your target.

I am assuming all the numbers are different (as in your example). If a number can appear twice, you need to take that into account.

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