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There are two functions here.

1) created with 'new' object.

(
  function se(){
    var a=10;

    var t = function (){
        var that=this;
        alert(a);
        that.book= function (){
            alert(that);
        }
        that.book();
    }
    return new t();
  }()
);

2) With object literal way

(
    function se(){
        var a=10;
        var f={
            init:function(){
                alert(a);
            }
        }                   
        f.init();
    }()
);

So what is the best practice to use? and why? What is the purpose of using 'this' in the 1st example?

share|improve this question
    
The functions aren't self-invoking, which implies recursion – Esailija Jun 8 '12 at 6:19
    
@Esailija: you could say the se functions are self-invoking here. – haylem Jun 8 '12 at 6:22
1  
Best practice is neither option. Both create an object that is not stored anywhere so the net effect is to display two alerts (first option) or a single alert (second option). @haylem: they're not self-invoking - the function body does not recursively call the function. They're "immediately invoked function expressions". – nnnnnn Jun 8 '12 at 6:24
    
@nnnnnn: "could say" as in "you can understand that the OP would call them that" and not know "immediately invoked function expressions". – haylem Jun 8 '12 at 6:52
    
'this' in the 1st example is a "link" to an object that WILL BE created by calling new t() – shershen Jun 8 '12 at 10:04

There's a bit of confusion between multiple things here.

You may want to read up on:

  • closures,
  • scoping in JavaScript,
  • and prototype-based inheritance.
share|improve this answer

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