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Which Git hosting provider would you use for commercial development?

Edit: Let's not turn this question into a discussion of whether a hosting provider is really necessary for a distributed source code management (SCM) system. Have a look at GitHub to see some of the benefits a hosting provider might give you.

Second, the fact that Git is distributed is hardly the only benefit to use it over Subversion. For example, branching and especially merging is much easier in Git.

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closed as off topic by Will Mar 6 '12 at 14:58

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Jeez, I was only asking. Question deleted. –  Mike F Sep 20 '08 at 22:52
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I'm sorry, Mike F, I didn't mean to offend you, just to keep this particular question on-topic. You brought up an interesting subject - feel free to start another question to get the input you need. –  Micke Sep 21 '08 at 20:13
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voting to close as subjective/argumentative -- or at least should be a wiki –  STW Jun 8 '10 at 19:38
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Why is GitHub linking over to the Wikipedia? There's no listing of benefits of a hosting provider on that page. –  James Skemp Sep 7 '11 at 23:51
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27 Answers

up vote 108 down vote accepted

The obvious but correct answer: GitHub

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I pay $50 a month for my GitHub account. I don't need that large of an account. I just like them that much. –  Kenneth Reitz May 21 '10 at 6:50
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GitHub is ridiculously expensive if you need a lot of private repositories. Other than using it for public projects - not really a point to it. –  Erik Aigner Apr 13 '11 at 10:32
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Completely agree with Erik. For a small startup planning on doing private/commercial development github is extravagantly expensive compared to all the dirt cheap competition. That said, for public repository hosting, there's nothing better. –  kurige Jun 11 '11 at 10:34
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Yeah... github offers everything you need and does it all better than everyone else. Plus, their velocity has reached a point where it is facebook for developers - you don't want to be that guy that everyone hates because they're doing it differently than everyone else. –  balupton Jun 22 '11 at 6:30
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GitHub is definitely expensive for a freelancer - the tendency here is to many small repositories, with few collaborators. –  Toby Hede Sep 14 '11 at 3:54
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https://bitbucket.org will give you unlimited private git repositories with up to five users. More users are available in the paid plan.

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seems to be good and reliable! offers good free plan. –  happyhardik Oct 15 '11 at 7:18
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Free plan for up to 5 users. –  Luka Rahne Oct 17 '11 at 13:50
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Now it is FREE UNLIMITED PRIVATE REPOSITORIES. :) –  Brendan Nov 19 '11 at 3:45
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bitbucket is my preference too. –  Vasilis Lourdas Dec 18 '11 at 21:45
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The problem with bitbucket IMO is account management. They don't have an organization concept unlike github, and the user accounts do not belong to the company, like github. If you have many users this management can be a nightmare. –  tuler Feb 29 '12 at 22:07
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Unfuddle is pretty nice, and has issue tracking as well.

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Unfuddle also offers free private hosting (for very small projects). –  Armand Apr 9 '10 at 13:25
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amazing. allows free private repositories. –  infiniteloop Feb 7 '11 at 19:55
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Beanstalk gives you 1 free private repository as well (they call it a 'Trial' account, but there's no expiration date). –  jerhinesmith Feb 7 '11 at 21:54
    
I like it, but Unfuddle is a bit stingy when it comes to storage space. A $49 a month plan only gives you 4GB. –  don Dec 23 '11 at 19:10
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Don't forget repositoryhosting.com, their price is very affordable.

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+1 for repositoryhosting.com - by far the best price compared to what else is out there. –  Ryan Farley May 12 '10 at 4:58
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Another +1 for me. Use them for a long time and love them. –  kolrie Aug 19 '10 at 2:44
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We've been using them for over a year now. Can say nothing but good things about it. –  Adam Lewis Jul 17 '11 at 18:49
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For commercial development I'd use my own server. If your business relies heavily on your source-code then you might consider holding the source with your own hands.

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Why is that an either-or question, though? There is no limit to the number of repositories you can have, so with DVCS it makes even more sense to keep the source both on an internal and on a repo hoster. (Or two, or three.) –  Aristotle Pagaltzis Sep 21 '08 at 17:11
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You should elaborate on your answer. –  Flame Sep 23 '08 at 17:19
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+1 For commercial development I'd use my own server. It's a matter of trust and I don't trust github. –  Fake Code Monkey Rashid Jul 21 '09 at 20:06
    
I like the idea of having a backup repository, but I also think, especially with dvcs, that blessing a single repository as 'mainline' is often valuable. If you want that, then a nicer approach might be to use a lower level backup solution, allowing pulls to happen anywhere, but only one cloned copy is writable. –  IfLoop Nov 29 '09 at 22:55
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With DVCS, everyone has a full copy, so trust is not an issue. If GitHub loses their data, no biggie. I trust them more than someone running their own server without paying due attention. So the question becomes 'Do you trust GitHub to keep your repository private, i.e. unhackable? –  Robert Jeppesen Feb 22 '11 at 8:39
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Edit: Though my original answer is true, just use github. Seriously.

Assembla is also reasonable too. They also offer free private hosting for small teams, commercial or otherwise.

Edit: Assembla is no longer free for private teams, but it's still relatively inexpensive.

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As far as I can tell, Assembla's free plan is public, though the lowest tier for private accounts is $3/mon which is practically free. –  Mark Renouf Mar 25 '10 at 14:44
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Assembla now (15 june 2010) offers free private repo with 2GB space. Free plan only include repository though. –  afriza Jun 15 '10 at 11:43
    
+1 for Assembla. Used it for two years now and very pleased. Both public/private spaces. –  Aaron Greenlee Sep 23 '10 at 23:49
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Just moved from unfuddle to assembla due to the 2GB space. I got the free privte hosting plan and it really meets all my needs! –  Charles Ouellet Nov 15 '10 at 14:26
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I was using assembla, then they switched to the pay-for plan. Don't like to badmouth them, but I don't like companies that change plans up on you. –  boomhauer Jun 3 '11 at 22:55
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If you want to set up your own web-facing server to host git, make yourself a favor and check out Gitosis. It's a Python script that lets you manage multiple repositories, manage access with public keys and everything.

The best part? You server's config files are in a git repo on the server and you only have to push your new changes to the server and it will take the new config into account. This means at any time you can roll back to a previous state of the config :-)

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We use and are happy with Beanstalk (Secure, private Subversion and Git hosting).

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Beanstalk has some neat features like FTP deployment so you can push your source over (S)FTP to a web server that doesn't have Git installed. –  Tamlyn Dec 9 '10 at 17:59
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You can also use InDefero which is a clone of Google Code with private/public projects. You get unlimited private projects and 1 GB storage for $30/year. You also have private projects with the free version. The good point is that the engine is available (GPL) and you can import everything in your own instance down the road, no lock-in problems. Note: I am the lead developer of InDefero.

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Great tool. I have installed it on my vps and love it. –  cnu Feb 10 '11 at 6:52
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I've recently found Project Locker. It's not instant signup annoying, and I'm still waiting for my account activation, but the service levels are interesting because the Free level has 500 MB of space, 5 users, Subversion, Git, multiple repositories and SSL support for free.

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Thanks for the recommendation Cletus. We at ProjectLocker actually are instant signup. . . account welcome messages occasionally run afoul of people's spam filters though. Users can log in at portal.projectlocker.com immediately after registration. –  brokenbeatnik Sep 1 '10 at 16:16
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I would recommend Codebase. They have tickets, milestones and timetracking, and you can log time and change ticket status from commit messages.

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Beanstalk is great. As of 2011-02-02, they give you 100 MB of space and one private repository for one user (you!) all for free. This is useful to act as a small hub for personal projects and code scripts. The interface is clean/modern and the company behind it (Wildbit) seems down to earth and human in terms of understanding users.

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+1. It's worth every penny. –  NARKOZ Feb 8 '11 at 9:49
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Have you seen Springloops? They are stable and their ticket system is simply amazing! The deploy function has made my life much easier. Unreliable as they are fast!

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Just discovered Codaset - plans start at $14/month.

Codaset is no longer operating.

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Codaset is no longer operating... –  Nicolás Nov 15 '11 at 20:41
    
They claim they will be back - let's see where this goes :( –  Goran Nov 21 '11 at 10:58
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Gitorious would be awesome if they managed to make the installation process easier. I failed in my attempt on creating a private host. Yes, the source code is FOSS so you are free to use it in your private network.

But it seems installing it requires intimate knowledge on Ruby on Rails as the installation is challenging to say the least. Looks nice and unlke GitHub, you can use your own private hosts.

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I'm using SourceRepo.com (a.k.a. GitRepo.com and SVNRepository.com) and have been quite happy so far. The price is better than the competition, it's extremely easy to set up users (for the team and for clients) and it supports SVN, Git, Trac and Redmine.

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I'm using these guys too, they are pretty cheap but I've never had any real problems, only that it's a little slow sometimes. –  sleepyjames Feb 23 '10 at 10:39
    
hmm, I've had quite a few problems with their SVN hosting. Server often unavailable, very annoying - in fact the reliance on remote uptime (and the problems this has brought us with SourceRepo) is one of the reasons for switching to Git for us. –  zcrar70 Apr 13 '12 at 17:59
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http://bettercodes.org is also pretty nice, 2 GB for free Git, Subversion support and private projects allowed.

There are three types of projects:

Public (recommended) Any site member can join this project. This project will be listed in the projects directory and in search results. Project content and activity will be visible to any site member.

Private Only users who request membership and are accepted can join the project. This project will be listed in the projects directory and in search results. Project content and activity will only be visible to members of the project.

Hidden Only users who are invited can join the project. This project will not show any details and is not listed in search results. Project content and activity will only be visible to members of the project.

I have used "Hidden" for all my projects.

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In my experience GitHub and the other repo hosting providers go down way too often to be useful in a day-to-day development cycle. It obviously can be used to supplement your own hosting, though, as a backup and a nice commit/code browser/wiki/etc. Definitely don't rely on it as your origin. Your developers will go mad.

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A sage warning. Git being distributed means that GitHub being down doesn't affect development much. However if your deployment script deploys from GitHub it can be a frustrating wait to get code into production when the service is down. –  Ben James Nov 29 '09 at 23:12
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It definitely does affect development if github goes down and it's your origin. git push and just about everything else will fail. If there's more than a couple developers on your team this will quickly turn into a nightmare of merging. Not the end of the world but a significant waste of time. Best to just have a box in your office that you push to that has a post-receive that pushes it up to github. That way if github is down all is still well in the office. –  rfunduk Nov 30 '09 at 0:02
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GitHub is simply awesome. I would highly recommend it. Lots of features and an inspired UI design. Crisp, clean and clear.

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XP-Dev.com are pretty cheap and have Trac support

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We migrated from Codesion to Codebase and never looked back. Great Support, great new features in V4 and in many areas better than Github and all this w/o being that expensive than Github.

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Codebase is great for growing teams. –  Barry Nov 30 '11 at 6:38
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You can try http://gitfarm.appspot.com. It's a free private Git service.

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I would not trust it... –  knoopx Jun 3 '10 at 15:48
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@knoopx- Why? Sure the site doesn't look professional, but it doesn't mean much. –  DMan Aug 6 '10 at 3:28
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@DMan, often an unprofessional site does mean something. –  Tom Feb 4 '11 at 16:23
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@Tom- Yeah, that they don't have a web designer. –  DMan Feb 4 '11 at 23:52
    
and they also don't have a 'deactivate' button if you want to cancel. or if they do, its not easily visible. I am trapped now :P –  Sheikh Aman Apr 13 '11 at 10:34
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I have to add my support for either GitHub or Gitorious. GitHub if you can afford it, and Gitorious if you really want to self-host it and have the administrative staff needed in order to install it (it's not simple).

For my own personal use I setup Gitosis. It's really easy (as others have said) to setup (if you are using Ubuntu/Debian packages especially) and lets me use my linode VPS as a good private Git server for anything that isn't open source (I use my free GitHub account otherwise). If you can host on a box where you can use normal users + file system permissions you don't need anything other than Git + SSH. Gitosis lets you authenticate Git users via SSH keys (think GitHub or Gitorious without the web front end) which is why it's great for my private projects where some do include friends and coworkers.

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I use Codaset.

Also Codeplane looks like it has great potential.

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Codaset is no longer operating... –  Nicolás Nov 15 '11 at 20:39
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Codeplane is interesting. –  Barry Feb 15 '12 at 6:20
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If it's commercial:

  • large-scale: set up an own server with appropriate backup
  • small-scale: use Dropbox and set up a Git repository there
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do you have experience with the dropbox approach? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 21 '10 at 10:17
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I've tried using Dropbox. It is possible, but you must be careful when having more people in your team. Because if more than 1 person are pushing at the same time, it may mess the repo file in the Dropbox. If that happen, I usually just delete the whole repo and re-create the repo again and push. For coordination usually we, use chat communicator to inform the team not to push while I am push. Everyone must wait until the Dropbox Sync, then they can push. –  Yeo Aug 25 '11 at 8:14
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Older thread although still mostly accurate. gitolite seems interesting, there's even an article about it in pro git.

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I've open-sourced a script which integrates gitolite with active directory for those running winDOw$. gist.github.com/1710266 –  Barry Feb 15 '12 at 6:13
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Github has an Enterprise install that you can deploy on your own servers. $5000/year for a 20-seat license.

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