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I'm trying to retrieve the hosts from a http log file. Normally, I would do something like:

cat proxy.log | awk '{ print $16 }'

However, the log file is formatted something like this:

2012-05-21 05:55:01 503 <client_ip> - - - OBSERVED "Entertainment" - 200 TCP_RESCAN_HIT GET text/xml;%20charset=UTF-8 http <server_ip> <server_host> 80 / ?feed=rss2 - "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; .NET4.0C; .NET4.0E; InfoPath.3; MS-RTC LM 8; Microsoft Outlook 14.0.6025; ms-office; MSOffice 14)" <proxy_ip> 13356 479 -

As you can see, some fields are quoted, and have a dynamic amount of whitespaces. This mean that $16 does not always return the host. I can solve this in python using the shlex.split(), which returns an array.

But some systems I use do not have python installed, and I wonder how this can make bash script (w/ standard gnu tools) to split log entries in such a way I can address i.e. $16 consistently.

In case a reader have the same problem and have python available, here is my python solution:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import shlex, sys, string
EOF = ""
if len(sys.argv) == 2:
        try:
                field = int(sys.argv[1])
        except ValueError:
                print "error: <field_no> must be a positive integer"
                sys.exit(1)
else:
        print "usage: %s <field_no>" % sys.argv[0]
        sys.exit(1)

def process(line):
        line = string.strip(line)
        line = shlex.split(line)
        return line[int(sys.argv[1])]

line = sys.stdin.readline()
while not line == EOF:
        sys.stdout.write(process(line)+"\n")
        line = sys.stdin.readline()
share|improve this question
    
In this example which is the hostname and also can you identify the hostname from end of the line(at what position or token it will be present)? –  Raghuram Jun 8 '12 at 7:12

3 Answers 3

If that GET (something) http <server_ip> bit is reliable, you could use GNU sed like this:

$ cat proxy.log
2012-05-21 05:55:01 503 <client_ip> - - - OBSERVED "Entertainment" - 200 TCP_RESCAN_HIT GET text/xml;%20charset=UTF-8 http <server_ip> <server_host> 80 / ?feed=rss2 - "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; .NET4.0C; .NET4.0E; InfoPath.3; MS-RTC LM 8; Microsoft Outlook 14.0.6025; ms-office; MSOffice 14)" <proxy_ip> 13356 479 -
$ cat proxy.log | sed -r 's/^.*(GET|POST) [^ ]+ http ([^ ]+) .*$/\2/'
<server_ip>
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but several things can go wrong with this query. You have http commands TRACE,OPTIONS etc... to consider as well. It might be another transport than http (https, gopher?!). The only thing that remain constant is the amount of fields, encapsulated in "" if it can contain whitespaces. –  Dog eat cat world Jun 8 '12 at 9:57

if you only want to get rid of the variable amount of spaces, you can use sed before awk

cat proxy.log | sed 's/  */ /g' | awk '{ print $16 }'

with the substitution s/ */ /g any positive amount of whitespaces is stripped to one

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but this does not quite work. "Entertainment" can also be "Entertainment, Computers and Internet". What I'm trying to do, is be able to put this in some of array where i.e. $9 would be "Entertainment, Computers and Internet" –  Dog eat cat world Jun 8 '12 at 10:00
    
i think you could try something like "replace all whitespaces, that have an odd amount of quotes before" but I can't think of a way doing this with sed. perl could manage that –  Hachi Jun 8 '12 at 10:52

I'd try to match a field where the previous field is an IP address and the next field is an integer:

perl -MRegexp::Common -ane '
  $n=16;
  while ($n < @F) {
    if ($F[$n-2] =~ /$RE{net}{IPv4}/ and $F[$n] =~ /^\d+$/)
      print "$F[$n-1]\n";
      break;
    }
    $n++;
  }
' filename
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