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I would like to know is there any difference in performance between these two codes.

String sample="hello";
    if(sample!=null)
    {
       if(!sample.equals(""))
        {
            // some code in here
         }
    }

or

String sample="hello";
    if(sample!=null && !sample.equals(""))
    {

            // some code in here
    }

As far as i have understood, in the first code, if sample is not null then only it will go in to the block. same is the case with 2nd piece of code. What i would like to know is what is the difference in performance or better coding standards and why?

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From my opinion, there is no difference for that. –  Crazenezz Jun 8 '12 at 8:03
2  
I find second one more readable –  Jigar Joshi Jun 8 '12 at 8:03
2  
The compiled code will probably be identical. Make your code readable and worry about micro-optimization after you get real performance issues. –  bdares Jun 8 '12 at 8:04
    
The two code behaves differently when sample is not null and is not empty String though. Unless your control flow can leave the method in the inner if and the code after the outer if is just some kind of fallback, then these two implementations have different functionality. –  billc.cn Jun 8 '12 at 8:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you're asking about performance you should always measure. But No, there shouldn't be a difference. Besides, if that is your only performance-problematic code then I envy you, seriously.

As for coding standards. Less nesting is almost always nicer to read and follow. Which means that putting both in a single if, especially since they are related is preferrable. The pattern

if (check_foo_for_null && compare_foo)

is very common and thus much less surprising than another nested if.

EDIT: To back it up:

I have the two little methods:

static boolean x(String a) {
    if (a != null && a.equals("Foo"))
        return true;
    else return false;
}

static boolean y(String a) {
    if (a != null) {
        if (a.equals("Foo")) {
            return true;
        } else return false;
    } else return false;
}

which produce the following code:

  static boolean x(java.lang.String);
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: ifnull        15
       4: aload_0       
       5: ldc           #16                 // String Foo
       7: invokevirtual #21                 // Method java/lang/String.equals:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Z
      10: ifeq          15
      13: iconst_1      
      14: ireturn       
      15: iconst_0      
      16: ireturn       

  static boolean y(java.lang.String);
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: ifnull        17
       4: aload_0       
       5: ldc           #16                 // String Foo
       7: invokevirtual #21                 // Method java/lang/String.equals:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Z
      10: ifeq          15
      13: iconst_1      
      14: ireturn       
      15: iconst_0      
      16: ireturn       
      17: iconst_0      
      18: ireturn       

So apart from an extraneous else jump target the code is identical. If you don't even have the else:

static boolean z(String a) {
    if (a != null) {
        if (a.equals("Foo"))
            return true;
    return false;
}

then the result is really the same:

  static boolean z(java.lang.String);
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: ifnull        15
       4: aload_0       
       5: ldc           #16                 // String Foo
       7: invokevirtual #21                 // Method java/lang/String.equals:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Z
      10: ifeq          15
      13: iconst_1      
      14: ireturn       
      15: iconst_0      
      16: ireturn       
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+1: very nice answer! –  ssedano Jun 8 '12 at 8:54

As everyone else said, there shouldn't be any difference in preformance. Small tip - equals almost always calls instanceof which returns false for null. So writing:

if( !"".equals(foo)) {...}

does same check and is null-safe.

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Bothe have no difference in terms of performance. Because in first case it checks one condition, if fails it does not enter inside. In 2nd case also, JVM checks the first condition, if it return false, then JVM will never go for 2nd check. As logical && operator will always false if first is false.

In terms of coding standard, I will choose 2nd option, as it has less number of coding lines.

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Most likely the bytcode generated will be optimized to if(sample!=null && !sample.equals("")) since java performs an optimization in compile time.

If you are talking about the actual code you write it is better to have only one if. Since the structure of two if is more complex for the compiler (with no optimization). Although I have no empiric data to back this.

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1  
The Java compiler is fast. You won't have to worry about a line of code more. Or a few thousand more lines of code, for that matter. –  Joey Jun 8 '12 at 8:09
    
The answer is to illustrate rather than to actually evaluate the performance of 4 lines of code –  ssedano Jun 8 '12 at 8:10
    
Still, complexity for a modern compiler is a stupid thing to argue in most cases (saving a dozen #includes in C++ might be another matter entirely, of course). If that's the only reason here I'd say it's moot. –  Joey Jun 8 '12 at 8:24

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