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I have a text file which looks like shown below. It has some extra newline characters which I want to remove.

LINE1: @Line1Col1 @Line1Col2

LINE2: @Line1Col3 @Line1Col4 @ Line1Col5@

LINE3: @Line2Col1 @Line2Col2 @Line2Col3

LINE4: @Line2Col4@

LINE5: Line2Col5 @

I want to remove the newline character so that it looks like this:

@Line1Col1 @Line1Col2 @Line1Col3 @Line1Col4 @Line1Col5@

@Line2Col1 @Line2Col2 @Line2Col3 @Line2Col4@ Line2Col5@

A line is defined as complete if it starts with the @ delimiter and ends with an @ delimiter. Note that the delimiter @ is already present in the file. For example, appending LINE1 and LINE2 makes the line complete. Similarly, appending LINE3, LINE4 and LINE5 makes another complete line (where, on each line, the data LineXcolX is used for the purpose of illustration). So, I need to remove the newline present in LINE1 and retain the newline in LINE2. Similarly, I need to remove the newlines in LINE3 and LINE4 and retain the newline in LINE5. There can be multiple spaces in between; hence, spaces cannot be used for a solution.

RE-EDITED [Added a section of the actual file]

A logic I could think of was that retain new lines only for condition that the previous line ends with "@" and the current line starts with "@". However, I am not sure how to implement this in shell or whether better logic is possible.

@ 258908159@ 258908159@Subwork=E,Mment=SS09 @ 4@Jun 5 2012 23:24:41 @Jun 5 2012 23:24:00 @ 2@* "DUMMYI"U 120605 DUMMY DATA @Jun 5 2012 23:26:00 @ 403@ 21@PRCAIE @ 10780093@ -2@ @ -1@ -2@ 1@ 35@ 1@ @ -1@ NULL@ -1@ 154@ 1@ 40958044@ 1@ 1@ 3@ 0@ -2@ 1@ @ 258908158@ 258908158@Subwork=E,Mment=SS09 @ 4@Jun 5 2012 23:24:41 @Jun 5 2012 23:24:00 @ 2@ 3TEST3
END @Jun 5 2012 23:26:00 @ 402@ 21@ @ 10780093@ -2@ @ -1@ -2@ 1@ 35@ 1@ @ -1@ NULL@ -1@ 154@ 1@ 40958044@ 1@ 1@ 3@ 0@ -2@ 0@

#####New Line is required Here ALL other new line must be removed

@ 258908158@ 258908158@Subwork=E,Mment=SS09 @ 4@Jun 5 2012 23:24:41 @Jun 5 2012 23:24:00 @ 2@* "DUMMYI"U 120605 DUMMY @Jun 5 2012 23:26:00 @ 402@ 21@PRCAIE @ 10780093@ -2@ @ -1@ -2@ 1@ 35@ 1@ @ -1@ NULL@ -1@ 154@ 1@ 40958044@ 1@ 1@ 3@ 0@ -2@ 1@ @ 258908157@ 258908157@Subwork=E,Mment=SS09 @ 4@Jun 5 2012 23:24:41 @Jun 5 2012 23:24:00 @ 2@ 3TEST3
END @Jun 5 2012 23:26:00 @ 401@ 21@ @ 10780093@ -2@ @ -1@ -2@ 1@ 35@ 1@ @ -1@ NULL@ -1@ 154@ 1@ 40958044@ 1@ 1@ 3@ 0@ -2@ 0@

Thanks.

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Based on the raw bit of example file content you pasted: It seems to me that it is not possible to know where to put the correct newlines because there is no 'pattern' that can help you identify that. The only way I see this can be solved is: You can count the number of '@' characters and put a newline every after Nth '@'. –  ArjunShankar Jun 8 '12 at 9:37
    
Please edit your sample input/output to demonstrate your requirement. –  tuxuday Jun 8 '12 at 10:03
    
Unable to get from new input(from RE-EDITED section) what will be Line1 or Line2(as in Line2Col1). Please clear on what output you would like for new input. –  drt Jun 8 '12 at 10:21
    
@ 258908158@ 258908158 ,this whole pattern is twice once in @ 258908159@ 258908159 and second which contains @ 258908157@ 258908157. Needs clarity on this part. –  drt Jun 8 '12 at 10:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My understanding is that we concatenate and store lines as we go along. If the current line starts with an "@" and the stored concatenated lot ends with an "@", then we are at a line boundary. Then we print the stored lot and start over again.

awk '/^@/ && l~/@$/ { print l; l=$0; next } { l=l $0} END { print l }'
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1  
+1, Small simplification: /^@/ && l~/@$/ {print l; l=""} {l=l $0} END {print l} –  glenn jackman Jun 8 '12 at 11:14
    
Yes, nice catch! ;) –  Balint Jun 8 '12 at 11:18

This simple Perl program should do what you want.

It works by concatenating lines from the input file and splitting the accumulated string when it contains a pair of @ signs, possibly separated by whitespace.

Note that it expects the input file as a parameter on the command line and sends the modified data to STDOUT.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $line;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  $line .= $_;
  while ($line =~ s/^(.+?\@)\s*(?=\@)//) {
    print $1, "\n";
  }
}

print $line, "\n";

output (using your example input data)

@Line1Col1 @Line1Col2@Line1Col3 @Line1Col4 @ Line1Col5@
@Line2Col1 @Line2Col2 @Line2Col3@Line2Col4@Line2Col5 @

Update

It looks from your actual file data as though there can be two @s together in the middle of a record so the method above will not work.

But looks like you are dealing with @-separated data, analyzing it tells me there are 25 fields per record, meaning 26 @ characters.

This alternative program accumulates the data until it contains 26 or more @ characters and then outputs it. It seems to work on the actual data you have posted.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $line;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  $line .= $_;
  if ($line =~ tr/\@// >= 26) {
    print ">>", $line, "\n";
    undef $line;
  }
}

print $line, "\n" if $line;
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There will be no entries with @@ hence both your solution works.I prefer the awk solution provided by Balint since it can be easily integrated within my script. –  girish Jun 8 '12 at 18:04

This might work for you:

sed ':a;$bb;N;/@ *\n *@/!{y/\n/ /;ba};:b;P;D' file

Explanation:

Delete all newlines except those surrounded by @'s:

  • Make a label for looping: :a
  • If last line break to second label b. $bb
  • Append next line to pattern space. N
  • Look for newlines surrounded by @ signs. /@ *\n *@/
  • If no such pattern, convert newlines to spaces and loop to label a. !{y/\n/ /;ba}
  • Found the pattern (all newlines converted all ready) or end of file condition. Print upto newline. :b;P
  • Delete the above printed line and begin new cycle (do not read next line). D

A more cryptic solution:

 sed '$!{N;/@ *\n *@/!{s/\(.*\)\n/\n\1/;D}};P;D' file
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