Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my mind is blank and I can't think of the solution...

I have the following code:

if (onlySelected === true) {
    if (r.selected == true) {
        result.push(pushValue);
    }
}
else {
    result.push(pushValue);
}

how can I simplify this code into this:

if (condition) { result.push(pushValue) } 
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try this:

if (!onlySelected || r.selected){
    result.push(pushValue);
}

or this if you absolutely need the type equality and not just truthiness:

if (onlySelected !== true || r.selected){
    result.push(pushValue);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This works good and looks much nicer. –  Daniel van Dommele Jun 8 '12 at 11:15
if(onlySelected === false || r.selected == true) {
    result.push(pushValue);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
!== true is not equal to === false –  Bergi Jun 8 '12 at 10:45
    
@Bergi That makes absolutely no sense to me, so would you mind explaining why? –  Anthony Grist Jun 8 '12 at 10:48
    
For example 5 !== true, but 5 is not === false. –  Bergi Jun 8 '12 at 10:57
(!onlySelected || r.selected) && result.push(pushValue);
share|improve this answer
    
Using !onlySelected is going to result in type conversion where necessary. Judging from the fact they used the === comparator, rather than simply ==, this seems incorrect. –  Anthony Grist Jun 8 '12 at 10:34
    
@AnthonyGrist That's true, I was supposing that onlySelected was intended as a boolean value. Same for r.selected. –  MaxArt Jun 8 '12 at 10:36
    
onlySelected and r.selected are indeed both boolean. –  Daniel van Dommele Jun 8 '12 at 11:08
if( (onlySelected === true && r.selected === true) || 1) {
    result.push(value)
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Or 1? What's the 1 for? –  Dave Newton Jun 8 '12 at 10:42

I think this would work:

if(!onlySelected || (onlySelected && r.selected))
    result.push(pushValue);
share|improve this answer
1  
If !onlySelected is false, onlySelected is true so you can eliminate that one. –  pimvdb Jun 8 '12 at 10:35

Hm, this is what I made it to.

onlySelected === !0 ? r.selected == 1 && result.push(pushValue) : result.push(pushValue)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.