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I have a class Bar:

class Bar
{
public:
Bar(void);
~Bar(void);
};

And a class Foo that gets a reference to Bar object as a constructor parameter and needs to save it in a private member bar_ :

class Foo
{
private:

Bar& bar_;
public:
Foo(Bar& bar) : bar_(bar) {}
~Foo(void) {}
};

This doesn't compile :

overloaded member function not found in 'Foo'

missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

Now i suspect couple of things that i need to assure, the second error is for Bar& bar_; declaration in Foo. Do i need to use an explicit constructor when declaring bar_ ?

I am interested in learning how the compiler works regarding this matter, so a detailed explanation would be highly appreciated.

Thanks.

EDIT

Okay I am posting a new code, since apparently there was nothing wrong with my code. Parser.h:

#pragma once
class Parser
{
private:
std::istream& inputStream_;
Analyzer& analyzer_;
public:
Parser(std::istream &inputStream, Analyzer& analyzer);
~Parser(void);
};

Parser.cpp :

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Parser.h"
#include "Analyzer.h"
Parser::Parser(std::istream &inputStream, Analyzer& analyzer ) : inputStream_(inputStream),     analyzer_(analyzer) {}

Parser::~Parser(void) {}

Analyzer.h :

 #pragma once
class Analyzer
{
public:
    Analyzer(void);
    ~Analyzer(void);
};
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1  
What is Parser? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 8 '12 at 10:39
1  
The code is fine (apart from missing definitions of Bar's c-tor and d-tor), your error message mentions Parser - what is it? –  jrok Jun 8 '12 at 10:39
3  
They are relevant. The downvote is because you didn't check your question before posting it. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 8 '12 at 10:44
2  
Well, not downvoting you: downvoting the question, which is entirely different. –  Gorpik Jun 8 '12 at 10:51
1  
@Michael - and then we see that you should add an #include "Analyzer.h" to the Parser.h file. –  Bo Persson Jun 8 '12 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This doesn't compile :

overloaded member function not found in 'Foo'    
missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

The code snippet you provided does indeed compile. I can tell you a little bit about these errors though.

The first error message happens when you compile a method that has the same name but a different signature from methods declared with the same name in your class. For example, if you had:

class A {
public:
    int foo (int);
};

int A::foo () { return 0; }

The compiler will issue an error about not finding an overloaded member function. The compiler thinks foo is overloaded, because foo(void) is different from foo(int).

The second error happens when you define a variable or function without a type. This is usually not the actual problem, but a consequence of some other problem. For example, if your code tried to use a class before it was declared, like:

B b;
class B {};

You would get the second error about missing type specifier, but it is talking about B on the first line.

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