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I'm looking for the most efficient (or elegant) way to vertically and horizontally center content of variable height. I've come up with this: http://cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/16, which uses css tables to vertically center the main content.

My demands for writing this particular piece of code were:

  • Must be able to center variable and fixed width content vertically and horizontally
  • Centered content must be inside the normal document flow (so no overlapping)
  • Sticky footer and normal header, both of 100% width
  • As few hacks, ugly code or non-semantic html as possible
  • I didn't care about support for IE6, IE7 (I'll use a different stylesheet for them)

The weird thing is that the demands above are only met when the header and footer are set to display:table-row, and the body-tag to display:table. Which is weird because as I understand it the css will generate anonymous table elements when parent table elements are missing. So display:table-cell should work without all the surrounding elements, but yet I've not been able to make it work.

If it were up to me I would prefer to not mess with the display mode for the body tag, and leave the header and footer on display:block. But I've not been able to make it work. Does anyone understand why this doesn't work, and how to meet the above demands without the use of display:table and display:table-row?

For those who would rather not visit cssdeck to view my sourcecode I'll post it here:

HTML

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Vertical Centering</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="header">header</div>
        <div id="vertical">
            <div id="horizontal">content</div>
        </div>
        <div id="footer">footer</div>
    </body>
</html>

CSS

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

body {
    display: table;
}

#header {
    display: table-row;
    height: 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#vertical {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

#horizontal {
    height: 500px;
    width: 500px;
    margin: auto;
    background: gray;
}

#footer {
    height: 2em;
    display: table-row;
    width: 100%;
    background: gray;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Can you show us the html where you are actually having problems? –  Tony318 Jun 8 '12 at 11:32
    
@Tony318, of course I've added it to the question (a working/editable example can be found here: cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/16). –  user1218247 Jun 8 '12 at 11:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+150

Actually, the browser is inserting an anonymous table element as you expected. However, this element only exists to make the table semantics work. There isn't any way in CSS to target this anonymous block to give it 100% width and height, which your layout requires.

You'll need an actual element in your HTML to act as the "table" object if you want to alter its presentation.

share|improve this answer
    
So how would you simplify (or improve) the code, keeping in mind the demands as stated in the question? Is it possible to obtain this layout more elegantly? –  user1218247 Jun 10 '12 at 14:06
2  
I wouldn't. If you want the whole page to use the table layout algorithm then there's no problem giving display:table; to the body element. If you don't want to treat the body specially then I would add a container element, and give that the table layout. Remember the issue here is that you want to apply extra styling to an otherwise anonymous element so you have to give it something to be referred to by. Although you don't want to add elements, this is acceptable here because your elements' layouts need to be related to each other, they aren't standalone. –  Gareth Jun 10 '12 at 23:16
    
Thank you, this is the first clear, articulate answer that relates to what I asked. –  user1218247 Jun 11 '12 at 10:34
    
By the way, I've made a design with an extra container with table layout, as you specified. Given this design (that uses an extra unsemantic div for the table layout), and the original (which applies the table layout to the body), which would you prefer? (you can find the designs here: cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/16 (original) and cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/51 (extra container with table layout) –  user1218247 Jun 11 '12 at 12:24

How Does display property Work?

The display property allows you to specify a range of table-related values in order to make elements display as though they were table elements. The available display values are:

  • table makes the element behave like a table element
  • table-row makes the element behave like a table row (tr) element
  • table-cell makes the element behave like a table cell (td) element
  • table-row-group makes the element behave like a table body row group (tbody) element
  • table-header-group makes the element behave like a table header row group (thead) element
  • table-footer-group makes the element behave like a table footer row group (tfoot) element
  • table-caption makes the element behave like a table caption element
  • table-column makes the element behave like a table column (col) element
  • table-column-group makes the element behave like a table column group (colgroup) element

check complete list here... http://www.digital-web.com/articles/everything_you_know_about_CSS_Is_wrong/

but your issue can be solved like this

Check working fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/jZJXf/1/

Css should be like this.

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
body {
    display: table;
}


#header {
    width: 100%;
    height: 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#vertical {
    display: table;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

#horizontal {
    display:table;
    height: 500px;
    width: 500px;
    margin: 10% auto 0% auto;
    background: gray;
}

#footer {
    height: 2em;
    width: 100%;
    background: gray;
    bottom: 0px;
    display: table;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info, but with your solution the footer ends up underneath the browser viewport. Any idea how to fix that? –  user1218247 Jun 11 '12 at 9:03
1  
check this. jsfiddle.net/jZJXf/2 –  CSS Guy Jun 11 '12 at 9:12
    
It looks all right in jsfiddle, but check it out here: cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/48, the footer is almost in the middle of the screen. Your margins on #horizontal sort of center the element, but this won't work for every resolution (in fact, it doesn't for mine). –  user1218247 Jun 11 '12 at 9:38
    
Remove the top and bottom margins, and the layout collapses. So at the moment, this still doesn't solve my layout problem, as the original code will perform the vertical centering better, have a sticky footer and use less display:table tags. To rephrase my original question, what I'm looking for is: can you improve on my code without affecting its functionality or adding extra complexity? –  user1218247 Jun 11 '12 at 9:43
    
check in cssdesk cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/49 –  CSS Guy Jun 11 '12 at 10:00

This work for me (CSS):

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

body {
}

#header {
    height: 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#vertical {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 500px;
    height: 500px;
}

#horizontal {
    height: 300px;
    width: 300px;
    margin: auto;
    background: gray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried it, but it doesn't work for me: this way you lose the sticky footer, and the horizontal centering is off (too far to the left). –  user1218247 Jun 8 '12 at 12:20

Your problem is the layout. You need an opening div that displays table. Then inside of that you next a div that displays table row. Inside of there you next your table cell divs.

<div id="testTable">
  <div id="testRow">
    <div id="testCell"></div>
    <div id="testCell"></div>
  </div>
  <div id="testRow">
    <div id="testCell"></div>
    <div id="testCell"></div>
  </div>
 </div>

That should be the layout of your divs.

CSS as follows.

#testTable {
display: table;
}
#testRow {
display: table-row;
}
#testCell {
display: table-cell;
}

Naturally you will add the content you want to the divs and the extra formating to the CSS. This outline should help as a guideline though. If you need a visual reference check this site out. http://www.quirksmode.org/css/display.html

share|improve this answer
    
But that actually uses more html for layout purposes. My goal is to lessen the amount of unnecessary html and css. In my example everything works as I intended, and it uses less html than your example. –  user1218247 Jun 8 '12 at 12:22
    
Also, it shouldn't be necessary to create the table and table-row elements for embedding the table-cell, unlike with html tables, with css-tables the browser should render an anonymous table automatically if any table elements are missing in the hierarchy (see: digital-web.com/articles/everything_you_know_about_CSS_Is_wrong). –  user1218247 Jun 8 '12 at 12:29
    
@Samuel How does this look? Took as much out as i could without drastically changing the layout. cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/20 EDIT Im not sure if you needed to keep the vertical div or not. If so you can add it back in with some slight adjustments to it. If it is necessary let me know and i'll try playing around again with it. EDIT2 It seems if you need vertical you can add the div back in and for the css just take out the display: table-row; line and it will still format properly –  Tony318 Jun 8 '12 at 13:17
    
It looks ok, but my problem with absolute positioning the header and footer is that it takes them out of the document flow, allowing them to overlap other content. Also relative positioning of the centered element by % means that it isn't always perfectly centered (only at specific screenwidths/heights). What I'm looking for is a solution that retains the original properties of my design, but without the table and table-cell display properties. –  user1218247 Jun 8 '12 at 13:38
    
@Samuel one final change. Realized that the footer was taking the bottom of the browser window, not the bottom of the page, meaning that if you needed to scroll then the footer would be in the middle of the page. This fixes that problem cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/27 –  Tony318 Jun 8 '12 at 13:42

In my opinion, the problem is the % height / width on your div. Well, not the problem necessarily, but the reason you aren't getting expected results.

Much like a html table, the "display: table-cell" element needs to be enclosed in a table and table row.

If none is found, an anonymous table and table row will be created (which it is in your code). Now, the problem is that the anonymous table will be set to auto-shrink the content.

Furthermore, any attempt to set the size of the content is ignored if it's unintelligible. You did give a height / width on the content, however, you are now telling your table-cell to take up 100% of the anonymous table, which doesn't make any sense to the browser.

Basically, the reason you are needing the table is to help the browser intelligently determine the dimensions of the area. You don't have to set it on the body though.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll ask you the same as Gareth: how would you simplify (or improve) the code, keeping in mind the demands as stated in the question? Is it possible to obtain this layout more elegantly? –  user1218247 Jun 10 '12 at 14:07
    
I personally wouldn't let the body act as the table. I think you could get away with it as is if you used pixels instead of percent, but otherwise, I would put a div around vertical to act as the parent and put the % height / width on that and take it off of vertical. –  MikeCruz13 Jun 10 '12 at 14:12
    
But that would mean I couldn't set the height to 100%, as that would push the footer out of the browser viewport. How would you solve that? –  user1218247 Jun 10 '12 at 14:17
    
That's already a problem with the way it is now. You can't have 100% of a 100% + 2em + 2em. If you want it to be liquid, I would go all % and use a min-height, min-width declaration. Your other option might be to put footer and header in vertical as siblings to horizontal. You can still position them at top / bottom. –  MikeCruz13 Jun 10 '12 at 14:22
    
I've put footer and header in a wrapper as siblings to the main content area: cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/46, as per your suggestion. Where would you put display:table-cell to vertically align the main content area, and how would you stretch the total height to 100%? –  user1218247 Jun 10 '12 at 14:49

Try with your html with this css, I'm not sure about the 10% top,bottom margin, but it worked con css deck.

body, html {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#header {
    width: 100%;
    height: 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#vertical {
    display: table;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

#horizontal {
    display:table;
    height: 500px;
    width: 500px;
    margin: 10% auto;
    background: gray;
}

#footer {
    height: 2em;
    width: 100%;
    background: gray;
    bottom: 0px;
}
share|improve this answer

Something I've come up with myself (which satisfies the design/code demands, and adds only a little bit of extra complexity/unsemantic html).

  • Pro: does not need the body tag to be set on display:table, and header/footer on display:table-row.
  • Con: Needs an extra (unsemantic) div for the display:table tag.

Check it out here: http://cssdeck.com/t/2veysdkg/51.

HTML

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Vertical Centering</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="header">header</div>
        <div id="table">
            <div id="tablecell">
                <div id="content">content</div>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div id="footer">footer</div>
    </body>
</html>

CSS

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#header {
    height: 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#table {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: table;
    margin-top: -2em;
    margin-bottom: -2em;
}

#tablecell {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

#content {
    height: 500px;
    width: 500px;
    margin: 2em auto 2em;
    background: gray;
}

#footer {
    height: 2em;
    width: 100%;
    background: gray;
}
share|improve this answer

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