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I need to split a file into different ones.

Exmaple (original file):

*****3123123*****RAW
text1
text2
*****2312354***RAW
text3

Desired output:

[File1.txt]

*****3123123*****RAW    
text1
text2

[File2.txt]

*****312312354***RAW
text3

I tried to use split, but I always get some extra white characters into the array

open FILE, "<file";
@file= <FILE>;
close FILE;
@lines = split (/(RAW\n)/, "@file");
foreach $value (@lines) {
  if ($value =~ /[a-z]|[A-Z]|[1-9]/)  {
    print ("$value\n");
  }
}

Output:

*****3123123*****RAW

 text1
 text2

*****312312354***RAW

 text3

Edit: if I use print ("$value") instead of print ("$value\n") this is the output (notice the 1 extra space before the value:

*****3123123*****RAW
 text1
 text2

 *****12354***RAW
 text3
share|improve this question
1  
Isn't it just that when you're splitting, it's not removing the newlines, so when you add print ("$value\n"), you're adding an extra newline. That's why it looks like there's extra whitespace. –  Shawn D. Jun 8 '12 at 12:30
    
without the \n I get 1 extra white space at the beginning of each value. –  user1444482 Jun 8 '12 at 13:32
    
The extra space is because you're interpolating @file into a single string, which by default interposes a space character between the elements. It's usually better to read a file line by line unless it's really tiny, but if you insist on reading it all at once you could write @lines = split (/(RAW\n)/, join '', @file or slurp it all in at once with `my $data = do {local $/; <FILE>}; @lines = split (/(RAW\n)/, $data; –  Borodin Jun 8 '12 at 13:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This program pulls the decimal number from the RAW line and uses it to name the output files. It expects the input file name as a parameter on the command line.

use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV or die "Input file required as command-line parameter\n";

my $out;

while (<>) {
  if ( /(\d+)\*+RAW$/ ) {
    open $out, '>', "$1.out" or die $!;
    select $out;
  }
  print $_ if $out;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. –  user1444482 Jun 8 '12 at 13:45

You might do better with line-wise IO:

my $id = 0;
my $FILE = undef;

while (<>) {
    if (/RAW/) {
        close $FILE if defined $FILE;
        $id++;
        my $path = "File$id.txt";
        open $FILE, '>', $path or die "Could not open $path: $!";
    }
    print $FILE $_ if defined $FILE;
}
close $FILE if defined $FILE;

Copied and adapted from one of my scripts that splits a mailbox file into one file per mail. You will have to adapt the script if the first line does not match /RAW/

share|improve this answer
    
Tried to run your script but nothing happens. The script starts but never finish, so I have to Ctrl-C it. –  user1444482 Jun 8 '12 at 13:30
1  
@user1444482: this solution works fine. It expects the input file on the command line like mine does. If you don't supply one it will hang waiting for input from the keyboard. –  Borodin Jun 8 '12 at 13:55
    
Why did you make this Community Wiki? –  Brad Gilbert Jun 8 '12 at 14:39
    
I did not really think about it. To have others fix bugs in my code? –  Stefan Majewsky Jun 12 '12 at 13:43
use strictures;
use File::Slurp qw(read_file write_file);
my $raw = read_file('raw.txt', binmode => ':raw');
my $header = qr/^ (?= [*]+ [0-9]+ [*]+ RAW\n)/msx;
my @chunks = split $header, $raw;
# (
#     "*****3123123*****RAW\ntext1\ntext2\n",
#     "*****2312354***RAW\ntext3"
# )
for my $i (1..@chunks) {
    write_file("File$i.txt", {binmode => ':raw'}, $chunks[$i-1]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Woah you definitely win the Perl golf heh –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jun 8 '12 at 13:26
2  
That's not even golf, that's straight-forward Perl how a seasoned programmer writes it. There is no obscure knowledge about it, only remembering the capabilities of built-ins such as split and using CPAN libraries where appropriate. –  daxim Jun 8 '12 at 13:30
    
Why the binmode? –  Borodin Jun 8 '12 at 13:46
    
Because I have to pick something sane, to safe-guard against copy-paste programming. I want my demo programs to be robust that way. I don't know the actual encoding of the file, but that's fine, split works with byte semantics, too. – Just imagine what would happen if I left the IO layer away! ☹ –  daxim Jun 8 '12 at 13:59

Here's what I came up with. I can't help but feel this is reinventing the wheel.

#!usr/bin/perl
my $fi, $fi2;
my $line;
my $i;
my @lines;
my @filenameparts;
my $filename = "file_1.txt";

open($fi, "< original.txt");
@lines = <$fi>;
open ($fi2, " > $filename");

foreach (@lines)
{
if (($i > 0) and $_ =~ /RAW/)
{
    @filenameparts = split("_", $filename);
    foreach (@filenameparts)
    {
        print "Woooo".$_;
    }
    @filenameparts[1] = substr(@filenameparts[1], 0, @filenameparts[1].length() - 5);
    @filenameparts[1] = ($filenameparts[1] + 1);
    $filename = @filenameparts[0]."_".@filenameparts[1].".txt";
    print $filename;
    close($fi2);
    open ($fi2, " > $filename");
    $i = 0;
    print $fi2 $_;

}
else
{
    print $fi2 $_;
}
$i++;

}
share|improve this answer
2  
You must get into the habit of adding use strict and use warnings at the top of your Perl programs. That would reveal a lot of problems with your programming that aren't otherwise apparent. You should also remember that you are programming Perl and not Java, JavaScript or C++ - wherever you have come from - as @filenameparts[1].length() doesn't get you the length of the second string in the array, it concatenates the second string with the length of $_ which isn't at all the same thing. –  Borodin Jun 8 '12 at 13:39
    
I heartily agree with you that my Perl programming is poor. –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jun 8 '12 at 13:48
    
Just trying to help you improve :) btw my solution is much golfier than daxim's :P –  Borodin Jun 8 '12 at 13:49

If you want to stay with code you made, then simply just replace your line print ("$value\n"); with print ("$value"); and you've got it...

Or before print remove \n with chomp($value); and stay with output print ("$value\n");.

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