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The manual states:

The operator ‘<-’ can be used anywhere, whereas the operator ‘=’ is only allowed at the top level (e.g., in the complete expression typed at the command prompt) or as one of the subexpressions in a braced list of expressions.

The question here mention the difference when used in the function call. But in the function definition, it seems to work normally:

a = function () 
{
    b = 2
    x <- 3
    y <<- 4
}

a()
# (b and x are undefined here)

So why the manual mentions that the operator ‘=’ is only allowed at the top level??

There is nothing about it in the language definition (there is no = operator listed, what a shame!)

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5  
The text you quote says "at the top level OR in a braced list of subexpressions". You are using it in a braced list of subexpressions. Which is allowed. –  Andrie Jun 8 '12 at 13:25
5  
You have to go to great lengths to find an expression which is neither toplevel nor within braces. Here is one. You sometimes want to wrap an assignment inside a try block: try( x <- f() ) is fine, but try( x = f(x) ) is not -- you need to either change the assignment operator or add braces. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Jun 8 '12 at 13:27
3  
Another example is when you wrap an expression in a system.time call: system.time(a <- runif(10000)). I almost exclusively use = assignment and I haven't run into many problems. –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 8 '12 at 13:50
1  
system.time(notanargumentofsystem.time = 1) Oh, bugger <- woulda been good –  mdsumner Jun 8 '12 at 14:15
2  
@GavinSimpson I believe the confusion of fun(a <- 1) is greater than the benefit over a <- 1; fun(a). It is rare to see assignment in the place of function arguments in other languages. R is a bizarre but anyway great language. <- working everywhere is dangerous, and the other danger I have seen in the past is when people mean x smaller than negative 1, they forget the space and end up with x<-1 (you may laugh at it, but it did happen) –  Yihui Jun 8 '12 at 17:46
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The text you quote says at the top level OR in a braced list of subexpressions. You are using it in a braced list of subexpressions. Which is allowed.

You have to go to great lengths to find an expression which is neither toplevel nor within braces. Here is one. You sometimes want to wrap an assignment inside a try block: try( x <- f() ) is fine, but try( x = f(x) ) is not -- you need to either change the assignment operator or add braces.

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Vincent, thank you but how does this answer my question about b = 2 being wrong in my example? Maybe I miss something so then please explain in more obvious way :) –  TMS Jun 11 '12 at 10:42
    
@Tomas I added my comment which you found helpful. I think this answers the question. –  Andrie Jun 11 '12 at 10:51
    
Thanks Andrie, great! –  TMS Jun 11 '12 at 10:57
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Expressions not at the top level include usage in control structures like if. For example, the following programming error is illegal.

> if(x = 0) 1 else x
Error: syntax error

As mentioned here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4831793/210673

Also see http://developer.r-project.org/equalAssign.html

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thank you for the second link! The most important information there is: "Where it is allowed, the = operator is semantically equivalent to all of the earlier assignments (i.e. <- and others)." –  TMS Jun 11 '12 at 11:04
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Other than some examples such as system.time as others have shown where <- and = have different results, the main difference is more philisophical. Larry Wall, the creater of Perl, said something along the lines of "similar things should look similar, different things should look different", I have found it interesting in different languages to see what things are considered "similar" and which are considered "different". Now for R assignment let's compare 2 commands:

myfun( a <- 1:10 )

myfun( a = 1:10 )

Some would argue that in both cases we are assigning 1:10 to a so what we are doing is similar.

The other argument is that in the first call we are assigning to a variable a that is in the same environment from which myfun is being called and in the second call we are assigning to a variable a that is in the environment created when the function is called and is local to the function and those two a variables are different.

So which to use depends on whether you consider the assignments "similar" or "different".

Personally, I prefer <-, but I don't think it is worth fighting a holy war over.

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