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I am attempting to port some code from PHP that basically boils down to property overloading. That is, if you try to get or set a class property that is not actually defined as a part of the class, it will send that information to a function that will pretty much do anything I want with it. (In this case, I want to search an associative array within the class before giving up.)

However, Perl is... quite a bit different from PHP, given that classes are already hashes. Is there any way that I can apply some equivalent of __get() and __set() to a Perl "class" that will remain completely encapsulated in that package, transparent to anything trying to actually get or set properties?

EDIT: The best way to explain this may be to show you code, show the output, and then show what I want it to output.

package AccessTest;

my $test = new Sammich;   #"improper" style, don't care, not part of the question.

say 'bacon is: ' . $test->{'bacon'};
say 'cheese is: ' . $test->{'cheese'};

for (keys $test->{'moreProperties'}) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->{'moreProperties'}{$_};
}

say 'invalid is: ' . $test->{'invalid'};

say 'Setting invalid.';
$test->{'invalid'} = 'true';
say 'invalid is now: ' . $test->{'invalid'};

for (keys $test->{'moreProperties'}) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->{'moreProperties'}{$_};
}


package Sammich;

sub new
{
 my $className = shift;
 my $this = {
  'bacon' => 'yes',
  'moreProperties' => {
  'cheese' => 'maybe',
  'ham' => 'no'
  }
};

return bless($this, $className);
}

This currently outputs:

bacon is: yes
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at ./AccessTest.pl line 11.
cheese is: 
cheese => maybe
ham => no
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at ./AccessTest.pl line 17.
invalid is: 
Setting invalid.
invalid is now: true
cheese => maybe
ham => no

Now, I need to make modifications to Sammich only, without making any changes at all to the initial AccessTest package, that will result in this:

bacon is: yes
cheese is: maybe
cheese => maybe
ham => no
invalid is: 0
Setting invalid.
invalid is now: true
cheese => maybe
ham => no
invalid => true

As you can see, the desired effect is that the 'cheese' property, since it's not a part of the test object directly, would instead be grabbed from the 'moreProperties' hash. 'invalid' would attempt the same thing, but since it is neither a direct property nor in 'moreProperties', it would act in whatever way programmed - in this case, I would want it to simply return the value 0, without any errors or warnings. Upon attempting to set the 'invalid' property, it would not be added to the object directly, because it's not already there, but would instead be added to the 'moreProperties' hash.

I'm expecting this to take more than the six or so lines it would require in PHP, but as it is a very important concept of OOP, I fully expect Perl to handle it somehow.

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5  
Perl classes aren't hashes, they're simply packages. Perl objects aren't hashes either, though they're commonly hashrefs blessed into a package. –  pilcrow Jun 8 '12 at 13:22
1  
How about showing a bit of PHP code? I'm not entirely sure I understand what you try to do. –  simbabque Jun 8 '12 at 13:25
3  
it is a very important concept of OOP, I fully expect Perl to handle it somehow. it is but so are getter/setter methods, as @pilcrow mentions, one can use tied hashes to achieve your desired syntax, but that doesn't make it OOP, the fact that Perl CAN in fact meet this demand is a credit to Perl's flexibility; still you should examine why you want to force incorrect usage to work correctly. –  Joel Berger Jun 10 '12 at 3:33
2  
Why are you blessing the Hash ref, when you are only using it as a Hash ref? See perlobj and perlootut for more details. –  Brad Gilbert Jun 10 '12 at 15:13
1  
@DigitalMan, I see your edit which has been rolled back. Go ahead and ignore me. If you are such an expert, by all means do whatever you want. I only took umbrage at your tone. Perl provides tools to overload hash key access. Other users should not attempt this but should follow standard OO protocols, since they allow for proper inheritance and avoid cognitive dissonance. I don't think I'm God, far from it; however your tone didn't engender a productive discussion. –  Joel Berger Jun 10 '12 at 15:50
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4 Answers

Update to the update

(I am receiving anonymous downvotes, presumably for abetting your misguided approach. :) )

Just to be clear, the question you pose is an "XY Problem", specifically an artifact of the mistaken translation of OO technique from PHP to Perl. For example, as mentioned passim in this question, object properties in perl generally should not be implemented as directly accessed hash(ref) elements. That's the wrong "X".

Jumping from one language to another introduces more than merely syntactical differences.

Update

You can accomplish what you want with something like this:

package UnfortunateHack; {

use Tie::Hash;
our @ISA = qw(Tie::StdHash);

sub FETCH {
  my ($self, $key) = @_;
  return exists $self->{$key}
         ? $self->{$key}
         : $self->{moreProperties}->{$key};
}

}

...

package Sammich;

sub new {
  my $class = shift;

  tie my %this, 'UnfortunateHack';
  %this = ( bacon => 'yes',
            moreProperties => { ... } );

  bless \%this, $class;
}

Original Answer

If I understand your intent — to intercept $obj->property calls where TheClass::property isn't necessarily defined — then perl's AUTOLOAD in an OO context will do what you want.

From the linked docs (perlobj):

If you call a method that doesn't exist in a class, Perl will throw an error. However, if that class or any of its parent classes defines an AUTOLOAD method, that AUTOLOAD method is called instead.

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According to my tests, AUTOLOAD will be called if an invalid method is attempted, but $obj->{'invalid'} will not touch it. –  DigitalMan Jun 9 '12 at 5:12
3  
you violate encapsulation using the hash directly rather than using getter/setters. if you provide these methods for defined attributes, then an AUTOLOAD method is exactly what is needed here. –  Joel Berger Jun 10 '12 at 3:29
3  
Why are you doing a data deref on an object? –  tchrist Jun 10 '12 at 4:52
1  
@tchrist, me? To comply with OP requirements. If you mean to ask the OP, well, I charitably assume he is in some hell not of his own making. –  pilcrow Jun 10 '12 at 5:03
2  
@JoelBerger, right. One answer is, "don't do it this way, don't simply write PHP OO in Perl, because it's more than just a syntactical difference." –  pilcrow Jun 10 '12 at 16:04
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You are completely violating encapsulation. To prove it to you, comment out the bless from &Sammich::new so that it returns a plain hash reference.

package Sammich;

sub new {
  my $className = shift;
  my $this = {
    'bacon' => 'yes',
    'moreProperties' => {
      'cheese' => 'maybe',
      'ham' => 'no'
    }
  };

  # don't even bother blessing it
  # return bless($this, $className);
}

The only way to get what you want it is to use magic.

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As I have said in my comments, the reason this problem is hard is that you aren't following one of the golden rules of Object-Oriented Programming, namely encapsulation. How can you expect to intercept a call that isn't a method? If your exposed API consists of getter/setters then you can intercept an unknown method call with an AUTOLOAD method. If you don't you may use @pilcrow's noble suggestion of using a tied hash (Edit: or @tchrist's valiant use of the overload pragma); still this is more a tribute to Perl's flexibility than your API.

To do this more correctly (and yes I see you "require" that the API not be modified, if you choose to ignore this, then call this post a message to future readers).

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use v5.10; # say
use strict;
use warnings;

use MooseX::Declare;
use Method::Signatures::Modifiers;

class Sammich {
  has 'bacon' => ( isa => 'Str', is => 'rw', default => 'yes' );
  has 'more' => ( 
    isa => 'HashRef', 
    is => 'rw', 
    default => sub{ {
      cheese => 'maybe',
      ham => 'no',
    } },
  );

  our $AUTOLOAD;
  method AUTOLOAD ($val?) {
    # get unknown method name
    my $attr = (split( /::/, $AUTOLOAD))[-1];

    my $more = $self->more;

    # see if that method name exists in "more"
    if (exists $more->{$attr}) {
      # if so, are there new values? then set
      if (defined $val) {
        $more->{$attr} = $val;
      } 
      # ... and return
      return $more->{$attr};
    }

    # attr does not exist, so set it or initialize it to 0
    $more->{$attr} = defined $val ? $val : 0;
    return $more->{$attr};
  }
}

# I don't care that you don't care
my $test = Sammich->new();

say 'bacon is: ' . $test->bacon;
say 'cheese is: ' . $test->cheese;

for (keys %{ $test->more }) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->more->{$_};
}

say 'invalid is: ' . $test->invalid;

say 'Setting invalid.';
$test->invalid( 'true' );
say 'invalid is now: ' . $test->invalid;

for (keys %{ $test->more }) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->more->{$_};
}

Some may say that my wording here is harsh and perhaps it is. I try to help those who will be helped, therefore seeing a bolded message like

I need to make modifications to Sammich only, without making any changes at all to the initial AccessTest package

then demanding that Perl bow to your whim

I'm expecting this to take more than the six or so lines it would require in PHP, but as it is a very important concept of OOP, I fully expect Perl to handle it somehow.

is irksome. I hope that future readers will see this as a case example of why encapsulation helps in the long run.

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2  
I strongly agree with you that $foo->{field} violates encapsulation. You just don’t do that with objects, often not even from within the class apart from within the specific getter/setter for that property. That said, but your question of “How can you expect to intercept a call that isn't a method?” of course has an obvious answer: you overload hash dereferencing via use overload '%{}' => blah_blah_blah; and all that jazz. I very strongly recommend only mediated method access to object properties. –  tchrist Jun 10 '12 at 4:50
1  
@tchrist, yes, and you can use a tied hash as well, but neither of those are OO, as the OP so explicitly demands. –  Joel Berger Jun 10 '12 at 4:53
    
I think he’s going about this wrong, and I think you do, too. –  tchrist Jun 10 '12 at 4:54
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In Perl classes are more than hashes, they are built on packages and you can define there whatever method you want and it remains encapsulated in that package/class.

You can see a code example in the Object-Oriented Programming in Perl Tutorial.

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