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Suppose I have this file (it's short), and over the course of development I edit it into this file. The output from a git diff, then, is the following:

...
@@ -7,6 +7,12 @@ int main() {
     // some code here, implementing section 1

     /***************************************************************************
+     ** New section header 2, with short description
+     **************************************************************************/
+
+    // some code here that goes between the old sections 1 and 2
+
+    /***************************************************************************
      ** Section header 2, with another short description
      **************************************************************************/

This seems undesirable to me, since it breaks up the logical change of 'this section was added' into 'this section was inserted into the middle of this other section's header'. I expected something like this:

...
@@ -7,6 +7,12 @@ int main() {
     // some code here, implementing section 1

+    /***************************************************************************
+     ** New section header 2, with short description
+     **************************************************************************/
+
+    // some code here that goes between the old sections 1 and 2
+
     /***************************************************************************
      ** Section header 2, with another short description
      **************************************************************************/

Is there option in diff that can correct this (i.e. so if I'm making a patch that correction wouldn't have to be done by hand)? I tried some of the other algorithms listed in git diff's man page, but they all produced the same result.

I know that Git stores whole snapshots of the source tree upon commit (and diffs are generated on the fly), so ultimately it doesn't affect the actual content, but could something like this possibly cause a problem during a merge, for example? I think on some level it just bothers me that the logical change I made is not reflected exactly in the diff it produced.

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Note: I used <pre> tags instead of four leading spaces for the diffs because I've been having this issue with Internet Explorer and haven't figured out a solution yet. –  vergenzt Jun 8 '12 at 13:36
    
Maybe you should upgrade to a different browser (or downgrade if you want to consider it that, but use a different browser). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 8 '12 at 13:37
    
There no way git call tell where did the user add those lines. –  KurzedMetal Jun 8 '12 at 13:38
    
The problem of human-perceived diff blocks vs algorithm-perceived diff blocks is mildly irksome but very common (in my experience), but in practice doesn't alter the net result. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 8 '12 at 13:39
    
@KurzedMetal Yeah, I wasn't sure if Git could do something like this, but I figured there might be some algorithm that looks at whitespace context or something, or maybe if there are two equivalent ways to show the diff, prefer the one that starts earlier. I don't know. –  vergenzt Jun 8 '12 at 13:42
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