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I have several different numbers in a group that range in sizes and would like to calculate which group the numbers should go in based on the max size the group can be.

Example of the numbers: 10,20,30,40,50,60

Example of conditions: the maximum total the numbers can add up to in a group is 60

So from the example above the answer would be:

group 1 would have the numbers 10,20,30

group 2 would have the number 40

group 3 would have the number 50

group 4 would have the number 60

Is there a way in matlab/octave or excel/librecalc this can be computed?

PS: A group can also have the number 40 and 20 the group total just can't go over 60. But they can only use each number once.

Is there a math term used for this?

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It looks like you are trying to solve a bin-packing problem. I'm not sure if there's a specific math term that applies to what you're trying to achieve, but it fits under the category of "combinatorial optimization". To fully answer your question, yes it can be computed, but which application you want to use is up to you. –  Zairja Jun 8 '12 at 14:51
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT:

The solution below uses a brute-force approach to generating powersets of powersets (although trimmed). Then checks for groups that satisfy the conditions set (namely divide all the numbers into groups such that no group contain a sum of more than 60). I borrowed some code from the powerset.m function in PMTK3 toolbox.

This should work fine for a small problem like this one, but I suspect it would grow exponentially in size for larger input. I'm sure there are better heuristic/algorithms out there, so take this as a starting point...

%# set of numbers
S = [10,20,30,40,50,60];

%# powerset of S (exclude empty set)
b = (dec2bin(2^numel(S)-1:-1:1) == '1');
P = cellfun(@(idx)S(idx), num2cell(b,2), 'UniformOutput',false);

%# keep only sets where the sum is at most 60
P = P(cellfun(@sum,P) <= 60);

%# take the powerset of the powerset, although we can
%# reduce it to no more than numel(S) subsets in each.
%# The idea here is: nchoosek(p,1:numel(s))
b = (dec2bin(2^numel(P)-1:-1:1) == '1');
b = b(sum(b,2)<=numel(S),:);
PP = cellfun(@(idx)P(idx), num2cell(b,2), 'UniformOutput',false);

%# condition: every number appears exactly once in groups
ppp = cellfun(@(x) [x{:}], PP, 'UniformOutput',false);
idx = find(cellfun(@numel,ppp) == numel(S));
idx2 = ismember(sort(cell2mat(ppp(idx)),2), S, 'rows');
PP = PP( idx(idx2) );

%# cleanup, and show result
clearvars -except S PP
celldisp(PP)

This gave me 12 solutions. For example:

>> PP{1}{:}
ans =
    10    20    30
ans =
    40
ans =
    50
ans =
    60

>> PP{6}{:}
ans =
    10    40
ans =
    20
ans =
    30
ans =
    50
ans =
    60

>> PP{12}{:}
ans =
    10
ans =
    20
ans =
    30
ans =
    40
ans =
    50
ans =
    60
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Thats looks very promising but how can I adapt the code only to use each number once? –  Rick T Jun 8 '12 at 16:02
    
@RickT: oh ok, now that I've re-read the question, I realize this is only half of the problem... You want to distribute ALL the numbers into groups such that no group contain a sum of more than 60, correct? A question though, do you want all such possible solutions or just one of them? –  Amro Jun 8 '12 at 16:10
    
I just need one of them at the moment but I was thinking of doing all possible solutions. Your thinking one step ahead of me ;-) –  Rick T Jun 8 '12 at 16:18
    
@RickT: I revised my answer to return all possible solutions. Not the most efficient way, but gets the job done :) –  Amro Jun 8 '12 at 17:28
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