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Basically I've got this:

$data_start = '2012-06-07T13:00:00Z';

if (($timestamp = strtotime($data_start)) === false) {
    return "The string ($data_start) is bogus";
} else {
    return "$data_start == " . date('l dS \o\f F Y H:i:s', $timestamp);
}

And it is returning:

"Thursday 07th of June 2012 14:00:00"

Why on earth is strtotime adding 1 more hour!? Anything to do with timezones?

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Z stands for Zulu which stands for Zulu Time which is UTC / GMT. And that is related to timezones, because timezones are related to UTC. –  hakre Jun 9 '12 at 12:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the last Z on $data_start tells that the date is in UTC time. I suppose your local timezone is UTC +1 ?

if you want to always work with UTC time, you can use something like : date_default_timezone_set ('UTC') to bypass your local timezone setting

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No, it's Europe/Lisbon should be UTC +00 right ? –  Edu Jun 8 '12 at 15:10
    
timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=133 it says lisbon timezone is UTC+1 –  nico Jun 8 '12 at 15:12
    
true... but that's because of daylight saving time... what a confusion! What about winter, when we move back again to +00 ? –  Edu Jun 8 '12 at 15:16
    
yes, you can use date('Z') to get your timezone offset in seconds. –  nico Jun 8 '12 at 15:18
1  
if you want to always work with UTC time, you can use something like : date_default_timezone_set ('UTC') to bypass your local timezone setting –  nico Jun 8 '12 at 15:37

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