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I have a couple of classes that share a common base class, with the exception that they differ in the way their methods work. So in the example below, Adder and Multiplier are the same except for the way in which their calculation is performed.

Is there a way to change "a" to a Multiplier on the fly? Do I need to implement methods which convert derived classes to each other? e.g. something like

a = a.asMultiplier()?

As you can see in the code below I tried reinterpret_cast to a Multiplier, with no luck, it still acts like an Adder. (gcc OS X v4.2.1)

#include <iostream>


class Base {
protected:
    int a,b;    
public:
    Base(int a, int b) {
        this->a = a;
        this->b = b;
    }  
    virtual ~Base() { }    
    virtual int calculate() = 0;
};


class Adder : public Base {    
public:
    Adder(int a, int b) : Base(a, b) {

    }      
    int calculate() {
        return this->a + this->b;
    }
};


class Multiplier : public Base {    
public:
    Multiplier(int a, int b) : Base(a, b) {    
    }  

    int calculate() {
        return this->a * this->b;
    }
};



int main() {

    Base* a = new Adder(3,4);
    Base* m = new Multiplier(3,4);

    std::cout << "Adder gives " << a->calculate() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Multiplier gives " << m->calculate() << std::endl;

    a = reinterpret_cast<Multiplier*>(a);

    std::cout << "Now adder gives " << a->calculate() << std::endl;

    delete a;
    delete m;
    return 0;
}
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6  
The idea of trying to convert one derived object to another is a good indication that your design needs to be revisited. –  Alok Save Jun 8 '12 at 15:14
    
Off topic, but I have always been told that you should not use "this" if it is not really needed in C++. But that is just a matter of conventions I guess. –  W. Goeman Jun 8 '12 at 15:18
    
I assume that this is an abstract example, but unless you have member data why bother with this? It is much more transparent to simply make a new Multiplier when it is required i would have thought. The moment you start casting you make things that much more complex for yourself and anyone else who has to interact with your code –  sji Jun 8 '12 at 15:29
    
Yes, this example is very abstract/simplified. In reality my Base class has many members and methods. There are a few methods in which I need to ask "if Base.flag = true, method X should do this, if Base.flag = false, method X should do that." I was under the impression that this was a sign that polymorphism is needed. The only complication is that the behavioral flag may change at run time. –  Rob Falck Jun 8 '12 at 15:37
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The best thing that comes up to me to solve this, is implementing a copy constructor, taking the base class:

class Multiplier : public Base {    
public:
    Multiplier(int a, int b) : Base(a, b) {    
    }  

    explicit Multiplier(const Base& iBase) : Base(iBase.a, iBase.b) {    
    }  

    int calculate() {
        return this->a * this->b;
    }
};

But since I am not the most advanced c++ developer here, it might not be correct or other people might have a better idea, just trying :)

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at least make that conversion constructor explicit or you'll invite subtle bugs –  sehe Jun 8 '12 at 15:29
    
@sehe, totally right! Corrected. –  W. Goeman Jun 8 '12 at 15:33
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I would propose to decouple the object's data from its operations. This way you can easily construct one object from another, overtaking the data. So your "conversion" will look like this: Multiplier m = new Multiplier(a);

Doing it the way you are asking for is impossible in C++.

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This seems to me that you would need utility classes that operate on data: Change your base class to a Data class whose purpose is only to store the data and pass the data explicitly to the Adder, Multiplier etc. classes.

You can still use inheritance in the utility classes if it makes sense after the above refactoring: in this case base would also operate on a Data object, instead of being the Data itself

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It is probably a good idea to change your design. In general I would say that it is a good idea to used inheritance when there is some kind of commonality shared by base and derived classes, not only in terms of data, but in terms of behaviour. Whilst not being very helpful advice directly I would suggest maybe reading some books on object oriented design principles. Trying to cast types in the way you are really makes no sense.

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I understand and, in conjunction with some of the other replies and comments, I can see the advantages of separating the data from the behavior. The example I gave is very basic. The classes I'm actually using do share a great deal of commonality in both data and behavior with the base class. It's only a handful of methods that are dependent upon the specific "type" of the object (e.g. Adder or Multiplier). I originally wen't down this path because I was under the impression that checking the type of a class at runtime was an indication that derived classes should be used instead. –  Rob Falck Jun 8 '12 at 15:26
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