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I am trying to find a way to increment a second primary key column in a table automatically when a new entry is added for the first primary key column. I suppose an example would be best here so here goes.

Suppose I have a table:

CREATE TABLE T
(
     SecNum INT NOT NULL,
     EntryID INT NOT NULL,
     Value FLOAT,
) CONSTRAINT [PK_T] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [SecNum] ASC,
    [EntryID] ASC
)

I would run the following statement:

INSERT INTO T (SecNum, Value) VALUES (0, 10)

My table should look like:

SECNUM | ENTRYID | VALUE
-------------------------
   0         0       10

I would run the following statement:

INSERT INTO T (SecNum, Value) VALUES (0, 10)

My table should look like:

SECNUM | ENTRYID | VALUE
-------------------------
   0         0       10
   0         1       10

I would run the following statement:

INSERT INTO T (SecNum, Value) VALUES (1, 20)

My table should look like:

SECNUM | ENTRYID | VALUE
-------------------------
   0         0       10
   0         1       10
   1         0       20
share|improve this question
    
Wait - in your 3rd example, did you mean for the last row in your ENTRYID column to have a value of 3? –  lkaradashkov Jun 8 '12 at 15:16
2  
Something like this isn't easily done - it's so messy and kludgy that I'd always recommend to just forget about it and use a single INT IDENTITY column instead. –  marc_s Jun 8 '12 at 15:17
1  
@lkaradashkov - I don't think so, otherwise why would it be a composite key?. Op wants that ENTRYID starts all over when a new SECNUM is added –  Lamak Jun 8 '12 at 15:18
    
@Lamak - EXACTLY –  Denis Jun 8 '12 at 15:20
1  
Can you give us the big picture of what you are trying to do here? There might be a better way to structure your DB. –  Abe Miessler Jun 8 '12 at 15:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is possible using an INSTEAD OF trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER TriggerName
ON T
INSTEAD OF INSERT
AS
    -- THIS TOP BIT IS OPTIONAL, IT WILL ALLOW ENTRY ID TO BE OVERRIDDEN IF 
    -- IT IS SUPPLIED TO THE INSERT AND WILL NOT VIOLATE THE PRIMARY KEY
    IF NOT EXISTS 
        (   SELECT  1
            FROM    T
                    INNER JOIN inserted i
                        ON i.SecNum = T.secNum
                        AND i.EntryID = T.EntryID
            UNION
            SELECT  1
            FROM    inserted
            WHERE   EntryID IS NULL
        )
        BEGIN
            INSERT T (SecNum, EntryID, Value)
            SELECT  SecNum, EntryID, Value
            FROM    inserted
        END
    ELSE
    -- IF OVERRIDE ABILITY IS NOT REQUIRED JUST USE THE BELOW INSERT
        BEGIN
            INSERT T (SecNum, EntryID, Value)
            SELECT  i.SecNum, COALESCE(LastID, 0), i.Value
            FROM    inserted I
                    LEFT JOIN 
                    (   SELECT  SecNum, MAX(T.EntryID) + 1 [LastID]
                        FROM    T
                        GROUP BY SecNum
                    ) T
                        ON T.SecNum = i.SecNum

        END

Example here

HOWEVER this is not very elegant. It could be worth asking is it really necessary? Could you get away with using a surrogate primary key, and use ROW_NUMBER() to create Entry ID's on the fly?

share|improve this answer
    
this looks interesting. I like sqlfiddle.com in your example. Never heard of it before... –  Denis Jun 8 '12 at 15:53

How about something like this:

INSERT INTO T (SecNum, Value, EntryId)
SELECT 0, 10, count(*)
FROM T WHERE SecNum = 0

It is not the cleanest solution and will perform pretty poorly too. But it should get the job done.

share|improve this answer
    
This firstly requires application logic to maintain. There would be nothing to stop someone opening SSMS and inserting random values not in keeping with the format. Secondly, it only works if a value already exists in the table for the secnum that is being inserted. If the table is empty no rows would be inserted. See here –  GarethD Jun 8 '12 at 21:33
    
Sorry, I am not sure I understand. If the table is empty, won't it will insert 0, 10, 0? And I am not sure how this requires application logic? INSERT INTO T (SecNum, Value, EntryId) SELECT pk1, val1, count(*) FROM T WHERE SecNum = pk1. All the data required to insert a row is right there. There is no external dependency. –  CodingWithLegos Jun 8 '12 at 21:40
    
Re: empty table, No because if there are no rows in T, then SELECT * FROM T will return no rows, so no rows would be inserted (see my example fiddle). Re: Application logic, this method does not force the database to comply with the logic, it just means this particular statement complies with the logic. If the only way to insert to the table was this method it would work, but what is to stop another developer executing INSERT T VALUES (100, 100, 100) even if there are no existing rows for secNum = 100. They have inadvertanly broken the pattern, even though it may not have been intended. –  GarethD Jun 8 '12 at 22:35
    
It is analogous with FOREIGN KEY referential integrity. If your application only allowed certain values to be inserted (i.e. checked the relevant primary key exists) you could partially maintain referential integrity without actually creating foreign keys. However it still leaves the column vunerable to rogue inserts that are not subject to the same integrity checks. –  GarethD Jun 8 '12 at 22:37
    
Well, there is no SELECT * FROM. It is SELECT COUNT(*) which will always return a row. But your second concern is completely valid. –  CodingWithLegos Jun 8 '12 at 22:49

This is how to do it without storing the value in the table (I'm not sure why you want to store it)

TABLE

DECLARE @T TABLE
    (
      SecNum INT NOT NULL,
      EntryID INT,
      Value FLOAT
    )

DATA

INSERT  INTO @T
        ( SecNum, Value )
VALUES  ( 0, 10 )
INSERT  INTO @T
        ( SecNum, Value )
VALUES  ( 0, 10 )
INSERT  INTO @T
        ( SecNum, Value )
VALUES  ( 1, 20 )

QUERY

SELECT  SecNum,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY value ORDER BY Value ) - 1 AS EntryID,
        Value
FROM    @T

RESULT

SecNum  EntryID Value
0          0    10
0          1    10
1          0    20

If the EntryID changes with SecNum AND Value use this query:

SELECT  SecNum,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY Value,SecNum ORDER BY Value, SecNum ) - 1 AS EntryID,
        Value
FROM    @t

RESULT 2

SecNum  EntryID Value
0           0   10
0           1   10
1           0   10
1           0   20
share|improve this answer
    
Surely your first query should read ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY SecNum ORDER BY Value ) not ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY value ORDER BY Value ) –  GarethD Jun 8 '12 at 21:29
    
The second query (partition over two columns) makes the most sense... if there is any sense to be had. –  Dan Andrews Jun 12 '12 at 12:49

Your problem can be solved by using an instead of insert trigger

 create trigger Trigger1 on T INSTEAD OF INSERT
 as
 begin                                  
       insert into T(SecNum,EntryID,Value)
       select SecNum,
             (select count(*) from T where SecNum = i.SecNum) as EntryID, 
             value 
       from inserted i
 end
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