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If I have an array that can/will be accessed by multiple threads at any given point in time, what exactly causes it to be non-thread safe, and what would be the steps taken to ensure that the array would be thread safe in most situations?

I have looked extensively around on the internet and have found little to no information on this subject, everything seems to be specific scenarios (e.g. is this array, that is being accessed like this by these two threads thread-safe, and on, and on). I would really like of someone could either answer the questions I laid out at the top, or if someone could point towards a good document explaining said items.

EDIT: After looking around on MSDN, I found the ArrayList class. When you use the synchronize method, it returns a thread-safe wrapper for a given list. When setting data in the list (i.e. list1[someNumber] = anotherNumber;) does the wrapper automatically take care of locking the list, or do you still need to lock it?

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What "thread safe" really means depends on the situation. What kind of "problem" do you want to prevent? –  harold Jun 8 '12 at 15:57
2  
Albahari's writings on thread related issues in c# is good: albahari.com/threading/part2.aspx#_Thread_Safety –  hatchet Jun 8 '12 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When two threads are accessing the exact same resource (e.g., not local copies, but actually the same copy of the same resource), a number of things can happen. In the most obvious scenario, if Thread #1 is accessing a resource and Thread #2 changes it mid-read, some unpredictable behavior can happen. Even with something as simple as an integer, you could have logic errors arise, so try to imagine the horrors that can result from improperly using something more complicated, like a database access class that's declared as static.

The classical way of handling this problem is to put a lock on the sensitive resources so only one thread can use it at a time. So in the above example, Thread #1 would request a lock to a resource and be granted it, then go in to read what it needs to read. Thread #2 would come along mid-read and request a lock to the resource, but be denied and told to wait because Thread #1 is using it. When Thread #1 finishes, it releases the lock and it's OK for Thread #2 to proceed.

There are other situations, but this illustrates one of the most basic problems and solutions. In C#, you may:

1) Use specific .NET objects that are managed as lockable by the framework (like Scorpion-Prince's link to SynchronizedCollection)

2) Use [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] to dictate that a specific method that does something dangerous should only be used by one thread at a time

3) Use the lock statement to isolate specific lines of code that are doing something potentially dangerous

What approach is best is really up to your situation.

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If I have an array that can/will be accessed by multiple threads at any given point in time, what exactly causes it to be non-thread safe, and what would be the steps taken to ensure that the array would be thread safe in most situations?

In general terms, the fact that the array is not thread-safe is the notion that two or more threads could be modifying the contents of the array if you do not synchronize access to it.

Speaking generally, for example, let's suppose you have thread 1 doing this work:

for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
{
   array[i] = "Hello";
}

And thread 2 doing this work (on the same shared array)

for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
{
   array[i] = "Goodbye";
}

There isn't anything synchronizing the threads so your results will depend on which thread wins the race first. It could be "Hello" or "Goodbye", in some random order, but will always be at least 'Hello' or 'Goodbye'.

The actual write of the string 'Hello' or 'Goodbye' is guaranteed by the CLR to be atomic. That is to say, the writing of the value 'Hello' cannot be interrupted by a thread trying to write 'Goodbye'. One must occur before or after the other, never in between.

So you need to create some kind of synchronization mechanism to prevent the arrays from stepping on each other. You can accomplish this by using a lock statement in C#.

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C# 3.0 and above provide a generic collection class called SynchronizedCollection which "provides a thread-safe collection that contains objects of a type specified by the generic parameter as elements."

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Array is thread safe if it is named public and static keywords - instant is not guaranteed - as the System.Array implements the ICollection interface which define some synchronize method to support synchronizing mechanism.

However, coding to enumerate through the array's item is not safe, developer should implement lock statement to make sure there is no change to the array during the array enumeration.

EX:

Array arrThreadSafe = new string[] {"We", "are", "safe"};
lock(arrThreadSafe.SyncRoot)
{
   foreach (string item in arrThreadSafe)
   {
     Console.WriteLine(item);
   }
}
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