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i am working on an algorithm and want to make my code more efficient.my code uses simple arithmetic and comparison statements.however,i want to replace if statements,as they could be time consuming.this code would be run over a million times,so even the slightest improvement is appreciated.please answer!here is the code-

int_1024 sqcalc(int_1024 s,int_1024 f){
    f=f*20;
    s=s-81;
    s=s-(f*9);
    if(s>=0){
        return 9;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+17;
    if(s>=0){
        return 8;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+15;
    if(s>=0){
        return 7;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+13;
    if(s>=0){
        return 6;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+11;
    if(s>=0){
        return 5;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+9;
    if(s>=0){
        return 4;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+7;
    if(s>=0){
        return 3;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+5;
    if(s>=0){
        return 2;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+3;
    if(s>=0){
        return 1;
    }
    s=s+f;
    s=s+1;
    if(s>=0){
        return 0;
    }
}

i wish to replace if checks,since i 'think' they make the algorithm slow.any suggestions?int_1024 is a ttmath variable with 1000's of bits,so saving on it might be a good option?division or multiplication for such a large number might be slow,so i tried using addition,but to no avail.help please.

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5  
Mother of ifs :O – mfontanini Jun 8 '12 at 16:04
1  
What does this function do? Have you profiled this to confirm that the if statements are a problem? – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 8 '12 at 16:05
7  
i 'think' they make the algorithm slow. With Optimizations Don't think, profile and only rely on outcomes you can see. – Alok Save Jun 8 '12 at 16:05
3  
With a problem like this you're usually better off rethinking the entire algorithm. if is as fast as conditional branching is going to get, so you need to find a way to make fewer checks, or cheaper checks, whenever possible. And that means a more efficient algorithm. And it might not even be possible to speed it up, but you need to understand why it's slow before you can do that. – Matthew Walton Jun 8 '12 at 16:05
1  
Since this method only manipulates s by adding f or some constant int, and compare s >= 0 you should be able to figure out what you want to return in the very beginning of the algorithm. It shouldn't even need a conditional statement (seems to me like some manipulation and a mod operation would do). – NominSim Jun 8 '12 at 16:10

I don't know if it is any faster, but it is considerably shorter (and easier to analyze).

int k[] = { 17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7, 5, 3, 1 };
int r = 0;
f *= 20;
s -= 81;
s -= f * 9;
while (s < 0) {
    s += f;
    s += k[r];
    if (++r == 9) break;
}
if (s >= 0) return 9-r;

Edit: In fact, the original poster came up with a clever way to optimize this loop by pre-computing the sum of constants in the k array, and compared s against the sums, rather than incrementally adding them to s.

Edit: I followed moonshadow's analysis technique, but arrived at a different equation. Original TeX formatting replaced with ASCII art (I tried to get MathJax to render the TeX for me, but it wasn't working):

S[0] = s                      >= 0 => 9 - 0
S[1] = S[0]   + f + 19 - 2*1  >= 0 => 9 - 1
S[2] = S[1]   + f + 19 - 2*2  >= 0 => 9 - 2
...
S[i] = S[i-1] + f + 19 - 2*i  >= 0 => 9 - i

So to calculate S[n]:

    S[n] = S[n-1] + f + 19 - 2n
               .-- n
=>  S[n] = s +  >      (f + 19 - 2*i)
               `-- i=1       .-- n
=>  S[n] = s + n(f + 19) - 2  >      i
                             `-- i=1
=>  S[n] = s + n(f + 19) - n(n+1)
                            2
=>  S[n] = s + n(f + 18) - n

So, the inequality S[n] >= 0 is a quadratic equation in n. Assuming s < 0, we want n to be the ceiling of the solution to the quadratic.

    +--                         --+
    |               _____________ |
    |             /        2      |
    | f + 18 - . / (f + 18) + 4s  |
    |           `                 |
n = | --------------------------- |
    |             2               |

So the routine would look something like:

f *= 180;
s -= 81;
s -= f;
if (s >= 0) return 9;
f /= 9;
f += 18;
s *= 4;
int1024_t ff = f;
ff *= f;
ff += s;
ff = ff.Sqrt();
f -= ff;
f += f.Mod2();
return 9 - f/2;

However, I am not sure the expense of performing these operations on your big integer objects is worth implementing to replace the simple loop shown above. (Unless you expect to extend the function and would require a much longer loop.)

To be faster than the loop, the big integer square root implementation would have to always converge within 4 iterations to beat the average expected 4.5 iterations of the existing while loop. However the ttmath implementation does not seem to be calculating an integer square root. It seems to calculate a floating point square root and then rounding the result, which I would guess would be much slower than the loop.

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thanks for the answer!it actually worked!!it is faster than before! – Utkarsh5 Jun 8 '12 at 16:24
    
@utkarshsinghal: you're welcome – jxh Jun 8 '12 at 16:25
1  
k[r] == 17 - (r*2), so you don't need the array. Indeed, it should be possible to factor the entire loop into a single O(1) expression: the result is a linear function of the inputs. – moonshadow Jun 8 '12 at 16:38
1  
this is becoming more and more interesting.... – Utkarsh5 Jun 8 '12 at 17:45
    
hmmm...i am definitely gonna try it!! – Utkarsh5 Jun 11 '12 at 17:53

First of all, I note that if the condition of the final if() is false, the return value is undefined. You probably want to fix that.

Now, the function starts with

f=f*20;
s=s-81;
s=s-(f*9);
if(s>=0){
    return 9;
}

and the rest looks incredibly repetitive. Let's see if we can use that repetition. Let's build a table of inequalities - values of s vs the eventual result:

s + (f+17) >= 0: 8
s + (f+17) + (f+15) >= 0: 7
s + (f+17) + (f+15) + (f+13) >= 0: 6
.
.
s + (f+17) + (f+15) + (f+13) + ... + (f+1) >= 0: 0

So, each line tests to see if s + some multiple of f + some constant is greater than 0. The value returned, the constant and the multiple of f all look related. Let's try expressing the relationship:

(s + ((9-n)*f) + (2*n)-1 >= 0)

Let's rearrange that so n is on one side.

(s + (9*f) - (n*f) + (2*n)-1 >= 0)

(s + (9*f) +1 >= (n*f) - (2*n))

(s + (9*f) +1 >= n*(f - 2))

n <= ((s + (9*f) +1) / (f - 2)

Now, the function has a range of return values for different inputs. In fact, we are interested in values of n in the range 0..8: the function supplied is undefined for inputs that would yield n < 0 (see above). The preamble ensures we never see inputs that would yield n > 8. So we can just say

int_1024 sqcalc(int_1024 s,int_1024 f){
    f=f*20;
    s=s-81;
    s=s-(f*9);
    if(s>=0){
        return 9;
    }
    return (s + (9*f) +1) / (f - 2);
}

and for all cases where the result is not undefined, the behaviour should be the same as the old version, without needing tons of conditionals or a loop.

Demonstration of accuracy is at http://ideone.com/UzMZs.

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1  
+1, excellent analysis. – jxh Jun 8 '12 at 17:06
    
thanks for the answer,and great analysis!however,when i tried it,it did not work.for example sqcalc of s=100,and f=1 should be 4,however,it returns 1.this may due the fact that (2*n)-1 returns the next number in 17,15,13.... series and not the sum of previous numbers.how do you think the sum could be calculated?A.P's maybe? – Utkarsh5 Jun 8 '12 at 17:40
    
as for sum of 17,15,13..... (17*n)-2*n*(n+1) might work.but it goes quadratic – Utkarsh5 Jun 8 '12 at 18:02

According to the OP's comment, the function is trying to find all values that satisfy the inequality:

N * ((20 * F) + N) <= S

For all N, given an F and S.

Using algebra, this comes out to:

1) N^2 + 20Fn - S <= 0  (where N^2 is N*N or sqr(N))

The OP should use some constants for F and N and solve algebraically (sp?) or search the web for "C++ find root quadratic equation".

One a function is selected, then profile the function and optimize if necessary.

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i tried solving the quadratics,and it makes the function slower for larger digits.following the answer by @user315052,i made this code.

    int_1024 sqcalc(int_1024 s,int_1024 f){
int k[] = { 0, 17, 32, 45, 56, 65, 72, 77, 80, 81 };
f=f*20;
s=((f*9)+81)-s;
int i=0;
while(s>k[i]){
s-=f;
i++;
}
return 9-i;
}

in this code,instead of subtracting a number and then comparing with zero,i directly compare it with the number.by far,this produces the fastest results.i could do binary search though....

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