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I'm looking to get the length of a number in javascript / jquery

I've tried value.length without any success, do I need to convert this to a string first?

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1  
can you show the code u are using? –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 16:25
2  
Yes, convert it to a string. The concept of a number's "length" is only meaningful in terms of some number representation scheme. –  Pointy Jun 8 '12 at 16:26

10 Answers 10

up vote 44 down vote accepted
var x = 1234567;

x.toString().length;

This process will also work forFloat Number and for Exponential number also.

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Excellent, I just realized I did that backwards when I tried it, x.length.toString(), which wouldn't work. Thanks –  Code Junkie Jun 8 '12 at 16:29

Ok, so many answers, but this is a pure math one, just for the fun or for remembering that Math is Important:

var len = Math.ceil(Math.log(num + 1) / Math.LN10);

This actually gives the "length" of the number even if it's in exponential form. num is supposed to be a non negative integer here: if it's negative, take its absolute value and adjust the sign afterwards.

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1  
Don't forget the math: log10(10) = 1; It should be num + 1 –  copy Jun 8 '12 at 18:35
8  
I consider this to be the philosophically correct answer. –  Fuser97381 Jun 8 '12 at 20:31
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@Noitidart Nope! I just tested: jsperf.com/number-of-digits-in-number –  Hubert Grzeskowiak Oct 7 at 15:24
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Awesme perf man thanks. The results i got show the math way is fastet, is this the result you got? here is my result: i.imgur.com/9BKxyd3.png –  Noitidart Oct 7 at 17:19
1  
@HubertGrzeskowiak Oh that's nice. I see that method is basically a math one anyway, but with some speed hacks. It drops a Math.ceil and uses a faster Math.abs instead. But I honestly didn't expect that performance gain in Chrome... Nice to know! –  MaxArt Oct 7 at 20:24

I've been using this functionality in node.js, this is my fastest impletation so far:

var nLength = function(n) { 
    return (Math.log(Math.abs(n)+1) * 0.43429448190325176 | 0) + 1; 
}

It should handle positive and negative integers (also in exponential form) and should return the length of integer part in floats.

The following reference should provide some insight into the method: Weisstein, Eric W. "Number Length." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource.

I believe that some bitwise operation can replace the Math.abs, but jsperf shows that Math.abs works just fine in the majority of js engines.

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As curiosity i've performed a JsPerf with nLength method vs toString().length on this....jsperf.com/convert-number-to-string-and-get-length/2 –  Artur Monteiro Dec 11 '13 at 13:20
    
Haha, that's basically the solution I provided! I had no idea it could perform so well. –  MaxArt Feb 15 at 10:55
    
Oh yes @MaxArt! You're probably the one that discovered logarithms and wrote the wolfram article –  Artur Monteiro Feb 16 at 12:12
    
I'm sorry, did I say something about me inventing the solution or something like that? Why don't you read carefully before posting? For the matter, the algorhythm was discovered way before Steven Wolfram was even born, and anyway the page you linked does not provide a solution in Javascript. I did, 9 months before you. –  MaxArt Feb 16 at 17:45
1  
The "+1" should be probably outside of the Math.abs call: Math.log(Math.abs(n) + 1)... –  Hubert Grzeskowiak Oct 7 at 15:33

You have to make the number to string in order to take length

var num = 123;

alert((num + "").length);

or

alert(num.toString().length);
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Well without converting the integer to a string you could make a funky loop:

var number = 20000;
var length = 0;
for(i = number; i > 1; ++i){
     ++length;
     i = Math.floor(i/10);
}

alert(length);​

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/G8tQE/

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This won't handle the length of any fractional part ... –  Pointy Jun 8 '12 at 16:31
2  
@Pointy yes, this is assuming an integer. Even if you make it a string, it will include the . as part of the calculation. –  Neal Jun 8 '12 at 16:32
    
yes, though it's an interesting philosophical question whether the dot should be included in the "length" :-) –  Pointy Jun 8 '12 at 19:26

First convert it to a string:

var mynumber = 123;
alert((""+mynumber).length);

Adding an empty string to it will implicitly cause mynumber to turn into a string.

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Try this:

$("#element").text().length;

Example of it in use

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4  
Where did jQuery come from?? –  Neal Jun 8 '12 at 16:30
3  
Its tagged with jQuery and he says JavaScript or jQuery in his question. –  Matthew Riches Jun 8 '12 at 16:31
1  
It being tagged jQuery doesn't mean anything. A lot of people tag jQuery for stuff like how to add 1+1 together. –  Esailija Jun 8 '12 at 16:35
3  
Sorry I must of misread that part where he said "I'm looking to get the length of a number in javascript / jquery" –  Matthew Riches Jun 8 '12 at 16:36
    
@Neal Hahaha oh God that was precious! Insta-saved! –  MaxArt Jun 8 '12 at 16:39

I would like to correct the @Neal answer which was pretty good for integers, but the number 1 would return a length of 0 in the previous case.

function Longueur(numberlen)
{
    var length = 0, i; //define `i` with `var` as not to clutter the global scope
    numberlen = parseInt(numberlen);
    for(i = numberlen; i >= 1; i)
    {
        ++length;
        i = Math.floor(i/10);
    }
    return length;
}
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Yes you need to convert to string in order to find the length.For example

var x=100;// type of x is number
var x=100+"";// now the type of x is string
document.write(x.length);//which would output 3.
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Do not link to your website in this manner. Please read the self-promotion FAQ carefully. –  Andrew Barber Dec 27 '12 at 16:05

There are three way to do it.

var num = 123;
alert(num.toString().length);

better performance one (best performance in ie11)

var num = 123;
alert((num + '').length);

Math (best performance in Chrome, firefox but slowest in ie11)

var num = 123
alert(Math.floor( Math.log(num) / Math.LN10 ) + 1)

there is a jspref here http://jsperf.com/fastest-way-to-get-the-first-in-a-number/2

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protected by fthiella Dec 16 at 15:34

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