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I have the following code:

var allWorkorders =

            (from wo in context.WORKORDERs
            join wot in context.WORKORDERTYPEs on wo.wot_oi equals wot.wotyoi
            join pri in context.PRIORITies on wo.prio_oi equals pri.priooi
            join s in context.SITEs on wo.BEparn_oi equals s.siteoi
            where wo.audt_created_dttm.Value.Year >= now.Year - 3 && wo.audt_created_dttm.Value.Year >= 2006
                && wo.audt_created_dttm < timeframe && (s.id == "NM" || s.id == "TH") &&
                (wo.clsdt_date ?? new DateTime(3000, 01, 01)) < DateTime.Now
            group pri by new {s.id, pri.prioid, MonthNum = (wo.clsdt_date ?? new DateTime(3000, 01, 01)).Year * 100 +
                (wo.clsdt_date ?? new DateTime(3000, 01, 01)).Month} into groupItem
            orderby groupItem.Key.MonthNum, groupItem.Key.id
            select new {groupItem.Key.id, groupItem.Key.prioid, groupItem.Key.MonthNum, Unit = groupItem.Count()});

            allWorkorders.GroupBy(x => new { x.id, x.MonthNum }).Select(x => new {x.Key.id, x.Key.MonthNum,
            Denominator = x.Sum(y => y.Unit), Numerator = x.Where(y => SqlMethods.Like(y.prioid, "1%") || 
            SqlMethods.Like(y.prioid, "6%")).Sum(y => y.Unit), Data_Indicator = DATA_INDICATOR,
            Budgeted = budgetedPlannedOutageHrs, Industry_Benchmark = INDUSTRY_BENCHMARK,
            Comments = comments, Executive_Comments = executiveComments, 
            Fleet_Exec_Comments = fleetExecComments}).ToList();

I want to create a for loop:

for (int counter = 0; counter < allWorkorders.Count; counter++)
{
    var item = allWorkorders[counter];
    ......

However, I get the following error: " '<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'int' and 'method group'"

So even though I have allWorkorders going to ToList() it's not being recognized as a list.

What am I doing wrong? I have done this in the past, the biggest difference being that in the past cases my ToList was at the end of the select statement.

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You should rethink this code. If it is so complex that you didn't see that the result wasn't assigned to a value, it is obviously too complicated –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jun 8 '12 at 16:34
    
@ Panagiotis Kanavos: It's not that I didn't know that it wasn't assigned to a value. I mistakenly believed it was assigned to allWorkorders. –  Programming Newbie Jun 8 '12 at 16:48
    
That's my point. If you can't see this easily, it's probably too complicated. I didn't see this either until Resharper indented the code –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jun 8 '12 at 16:55
    
@ProgrammingNewbie don't put a space between @ and the users name. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43019/… –  cadrell0 Jun 8 '12 at 16:57
    
@PanagiotisKanavos if you look at the comments on my answer, it is not that the OP did not see that the assign did not take place, the OP did not know the assignment was required. –  cadrell0 Jun 8 '12 at 17:00
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ToList() returns a result. You need something like

var newList = allWorkorders.GroupBy(x => ...).Select(x => ...).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
@ Brannon: Thank you for the help. Since you were the first one to answer I will give you credit for the accepted answer. –  Programming Newbie Jun 8 '12 at 16:43
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You can either use a foreach loop instead or add the () to Count, for (int counter = 0; counter < allWorkorders.Count(); counter++). In this case Count is not a property but a Linq extension method that you're calling on an IEnumerable, which is why it complains about a method group when you give it just .Count instead of calling the method .Count().

Also, you have two separate statements there and don't appear to be storing the part which you are performing the .ToList() against anywhere.

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This answer ignores the obvious error in the code. –  Brannon Jun 8 '12 at 16:38
    
@Brannon No, no it doesn't. See the second paragraph. –  JamieSee Jun 8 '12 at 16:41
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It is trying to use the LINQ extension method method Count() rather than the List<T>.Count

The reason it is doing this is you are not assigning the results of ToList() to anything. This whole statement is basically ignored because you are not using the return value

allWorkorders.GroupBy(x => new { x.id, x.MonthNum }).Select(x => new {x.Key.id, x.Key.MonthNum,
Denominator = x.Sum(y => y.Unit), Numerator = x.Where(y => SqlMethods.Like(y.prioid, "1%") || 
SqlMethods.Like(y.prioid, "6%")).Sum(y => y.Unit), Data_Indicator = DATA_INDICATOR,
Budgeted = budgetedPlannedOutageHrs, Industry_Benchmark = INDUSTRY_BENCHMARK,
Comments = comments, Executive_Comments = executiveComments, 
Fleet_Exec_Comments = fleetExecComments}).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
@ cadrell0: I see. I mistakenly believe that the allWorkorders.GroupBy code was assigned to allWorkOrders. Once I created a new var datatype for that code it worked fine. I guess I don't understand why it wasn't recognized by allWorkorders though. –  Programming Newbie Jun 8 '12 at 16:42
    
LINQ methods (GroupBy, Where, Select, ToList, etc) do not modify the collection they operate on. They return a new collection. This is similar to the behavior of string methods Replace, Substring, Trim, and others. –  cadrell0 Jun 8 '12 at 16:49
    
@ cadrell0: I did not know that. Until I began this internship a couple of weeks ago I had never even heard of LINQ, so I am still struggling with understanding it. Thank you for your help. –  Programming Newbie Jun 8 '12 at 16:52
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You didn't assign the second line (the one with ToList()) on it to anything. You ended the assignment of allWorkOrders with: "Unit = groupItem.Count()});"

Dropping on ToList() will make it return a list, but since you didn't assign it to anything it immediately goes out of scope and you lose it.

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@ YYY: Thank you for the help and the explaination –  Programming Newbie Jun 8 '12 at 16:45
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