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Javascript use variable as object name

How do I get JS to treat a string as a reference to a previously defined object? Simplified:

var myObject = new MyObject();

var myString = "myObject";

var wantThisToWork = myString.myproperty;
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marked as duplicate by j08691, squint, Sarfraz, mu is too short, James Allardice Jun 9 '12 at 8:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
If this is what you think you'll need, then don't use variables for storage. Store myObject inside another object used as a global namespace. var my_namespace = {}; my_namespace.myObject = new MyObject(); var myString = "myObject"; var itWorks = my_namespace[myString].myproperty –  squint Jun 8 '12 at 17:28
    
@amnotiam My answer details what your comment is talking about, it's hard to understand it from a comment. –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 18:14
    
@j08691 The accepted answer on that post is very hackish. I wouldn't use it. –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 18:15
    
I highly recommend this solution: stackoverflow.com/a/6394168/167129 –  Dallas Clark Apr 23 '14 at 2:24

4 Answers 4

If the variable is in the global scope, you can access it as a property of the global object

var a = "hello world";
var varName = "a";
console.log( window[varName] ); // outputs hello world
console.log( this[varName] ); // also works (this === window) in this case

However, if it's a local variable, the only way is to use eval

function () {
  var a = "hello world";
  var varName = "a";
  console.log( this[varName] ); // won't work
  console.log( eval(varName) ); // Does work
}

Unless you can put your dynamic variables into an object and access it like a property

function () {
  var scope = {
    a: "hello world";
  };
  var varName = "a";
  console.log( scope[varName] ); // works
}
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The only way, as it seems to me, would be to use eval. But as they say, eval is evil - but not in controlled environments. This is the way it is possible, but i don't recommend using eval, unless it is absolutely necessary.

var myObject = new MyObject();
var myString = "myObject";
var wantThisToWork = eval(myString).myproperty;
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and why was that downvote for? don't tell me because of eval. I already mentioned that i don't recommend it unless absolutely necessary. –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 17:25
    
I don't think this deserves a downvote. There are cases when you have to use eval (If you're trying to access a local variable). –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 17:25
    
exactly! And by this expression I don't mean that the situation of OP (wonder what's the full-form of OP) is one where this is needed. But besides my repeating it multiple times that don't use eval unnecessarily, what is that downvote for? –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 17:27
    
But it's still not a good answer. I think my answer covers all the cases –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 17:31
    
i didn't say it was a great answer. all i said is that it wasn't an answer which deserved a downvote. –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 17:33

You can use the eval function.

eval(myString).myproperty

Careful with eval, though, if this is something the user is inputting, it will execute any javascript code!

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There are better ways (that others mentioned), don't use eval if you don't have to –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 17:24
    
Yeah, I know eval shouldn't be used unless absolutely necessary and I just saw those. Did not know about that! +1 to those answers. –  sachleen Jun 8 '12 at 17:26

Use eval()

var myObject = {};
myObject.myproperty = "Hello";
var myString = "myObject";

var wantThisToWork = eval(myString).myproperty;
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1  
weren't multiple eval answers enough? This is exactly what i gave. –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 17:31
1  
Don't repost existing answers, there were already 3 answers like yours when you added it. Added no value to the post. –  Juan Mendes Jun 8 '12 at 17:32
    
@ParthThakkar : While, I was writing my answer and the time I posted it, already a hell many answers were posted. Some how notification for already posted answer did not come(slow internet). What made you think that I am interested in what you wrote ? –  Anand Jun 8 '12 at 17:40
    
i didn't say that you were interested in what i wrote. I just said that that was exactly what i gave. Btw, aren't we all fighting over this small question for no reason. I mean, my answer is littered with my whines of someone downvoting it in spite of me warning about the answer....let's just leave this matter. It's being stretched unnecessarily. –  Parth Thakkar Jun 8 '12 at 17:44
    
@JuanMendes : Every answer has been answered in 10 mins frame. This is how much time you would take, if you are dividing your time between watching football match and typing answer. Already posted message did not appear for me, so had no idea, that already answers were posted. –  Anand Jun 8 '12 at 17:44

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