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So, I've got a constructor for a splash screen. I'm using canvas graphics (ctx below is a reference to 2d context of the canvas element), but it seems when I try and get a local copy of the context that I lose it. Does someone have an idea why it becomes undefined where it does?(see below)

function SplashScreen(_ctx)
{
    this.loadScene = function()
    {
        this.img = new Image();
        this.img.onload = this.render;
        this.img.src = 'art/SplashScreen.png';
    };

    this.unloadScene = function()
    {
        delete this.img;
        this.img = null;
        CollectGarbage();
    };

    this.render = function()
    {
        alert(this.ctx);//<--------------undefined
        alert(this.img);//<--------------undefined
        this.ctx.drawImage(this.img,0,0);
    };

    alert(_ctx);    //<--------------properly defined
    this.ctx = _ctx;
    alert(this.ctx);//<--------------properly defined
    return this;
}

Here is where I'm calling SplashScreen(note: the below is from main.js, and the above is in splashscreen.js):

var ctx;

var scene_Splash;
var currentScene;

function main()
{
  ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
  alert(ctx); //<-------fine and defined
  scene_Splash = new SplashScreen(ctx);
  changeScene(scene_Splash, null, null);
}

function changeScene(_newScene, _transition, _time)
{
  currentScene = _newScene;

  currentScene.loadScene();
}

Expanding on this even further, here is the part of the index.html file that is referencing these scripts:

<html>
 <head>
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="splashscreen.js"></script>
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="main.js"></script>
 </head>
 <body onload="main()">
   <canvas id="canvas" width="640" height="960"></canvas>
 </body>
</html>
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2  
You seem to be making some incorrect assumptions about how this works in JS. First thing to know is that this has nothing to do with variable scope, and little to do with inheritance. It has entirely to do with how a particular function is being invoked. –  squint Jun 8 '12 at 19:46
1  
You should look into the prototype property of a constructor, which is the place to define your methods in. As it is now, you might as well use a regular function that returns a dumb object literal. –  Esailija Jun 8 '12 at 19:51
1  
...in other words, you should show how you're calling SplashScreen as well as the locally defined methods, as that makes all the difference. –  squint Jun 8 '12 at 19:52
    
Added some info to the post regarding where it's being called for you. –  ZachLHelms Jun 8 '12 at 20:07
    
How are you invoking the render method? –  Esailija Jun 8 '12 at 20:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try:

this.img.onload = this.render.bind(this);
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Works fine for me:

function SplashScreen(_ctx)
{
    this.loadScene = function()
    {
        this.img = new Image();
        this.img.onload = this.render;
        this.img.src = 'art/SplashScreen.png';
    };

    this.unloadScene = function()
    {
        delete this.img;
        this.img = null;
        CollectGarbage();
    };

    this.render = function()
    {
        alert('in render: ' + this.ctx);
    };

    alert(_ctx);    //<--------------properly defined
    this.ctx = _ctx;
    alert(this.ctx);//<--------------properly defined
    return this;
}

var c = new SplashScreen(1);
c.render(); // in render: 1

Make sure to instantiate the object with new keyword.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the above code I posted was it's own js file, and it's being accessed from another js file, I do use the new keyword, but it still comes out being undefined for me. –  ZachLHelms Jun 8 '12 at 19:55

When you bind a function to an event handler, it is invoked as if it was a property of the element to which you attached the handler; the function does not know that it used to be a property of some other arbitrary object.

The usual way to work around this is to use one or more closures to capture the values of the variable(s) that you want to be available during processing of the event handler.

According to the specification, you should be able to pass an object with a handleEvent method rather than a function. This method is then called in the expected way, i.e. the function is invoked as a property of the object. I know this currently works in Firefox but I don't know whether it works in other browsers.

share|improve this answer

Esailija found the problem that had been messing me up, others have pointed it out as well, but this was the first:

@Zahel that's not invoking it, it's adding it as an event listener to the onload event of the image. The browser then calls it when image is loaded, with this set to the image, which doesn't have .img or .ctx properties obviously. – Esailija

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