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HTML5 semantic web elements - why should I use them in a internal application. Semantic elements may be good for search engines to detect navigation, article etc. What will I gain if I use these tags in transaction oriented applications.

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Jun 8 '12 at 22:39

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Possible gains:

  • Readability
  • Accessibility
  • Lightweight applications
  • Less constraint on the network (smaller file sizes)
  • Easier to expand
  • Easier to train a second developer to fit in
  • Chance to practice good habits for developing external sites

Possible drawbacks:

  • None?

Basically,

<header>
    <hgroup>
        <h1>Logo and Application Title</h1>
        <h2>Clever Slogan</h2>
    </hgroup>

    <nav>
        <ul>
            <li>Home</li>
            <li>About</li>
            <li>Contact</li>
            <li>Test</li>
            <li>Stuff</li>
        </ul>
    </nav>
</header>

Looks better than...

<div id="header">
    <div class="top_logo">
        <h1>Logo and Application Title</h1>

        <h2>Clever Slogan</h2>
    </div>

    <div class="navigation">
        <ul>
            <li>Home</li>
            <li>About</li>
            <li>Contact</li>
            <li>Test</li>
            <li>Stuff</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
</div>

Also in styles

<style type="text/css">
    header hgroup {}
    header nav li {}
</style>

Looks better than

<style type="text/css">
    #header .top_logo {}
    #header .navigation li {}
</style>
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Why "readability" and "lightweight" ? –  Matthieu Napoli Jun 8 '12 at 19:46
1  
@Matthieu: Because normal elements can be read easier than a table for instance, or a handful of DIVs. a classed div is suitable too, but a cleaner element is more lightweight and easier to read (<nav> vs <div class="nav">. –  Second Rikudo Jun 8 '12 at 19:48
    
@JohnB Thanks for the edit. –  Second Rikudo Jun 8 '12 at 19:54
    
Thanks, great points. It does make sense to have these elements instead of old divs. Such code will readable, maintainable and adds structure to web pages. Next developer will be able to manage code better. I could think of opportunities on server side to filter/alter the tags in a global fashion [Disable Nav for all pages for request coming for a specifc User Agent] –  tech20nn Jun 8 '12 at 21:52

Some users who use accessibility features like a screenreader will be able to use your site much more easily. This also goes for device-specific-accessibility features, such as the iOS screen reader.

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Same comment as on @Andre's answer. –  Second Rikudo Jun 8 '12 at 19:50
    
No really. UIWebView on the iPhone (for example, other devices do this as well) have screenreader support in-application. This is also available on full-scale os-es –  Max Snijders Jun 8 '12 at 19:51
    
But it's an internal application, your aim is off. –  Second Rikudo Jun 8 '12 at 19:53
1  
No it isn't. Keeping up with the standards of the future for accessibility is a good idea, also for internal usage. Using the new tags has these (potential) advantages, and no disadvantages, you might have to use some JS to enable them in older environments though. –  Max Snijders Jun 8 '12 at 19:55
3  
@Truth what does that have to do with making something accessible or not? People are people. Whether or not they sit behind the firewall shouldn't be an issue. –  DA. Jun 8 '12 at 20:06

Accessibility. You may have a visual impaired user that needs a screen reader, for example.

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I agree accessibility is huge irrespective of the internal or external. And great thing about using these tags is you do not have to invest extra efforts whether you are a small development shop or not. –  tech20nn Jun 8 '12 at 21:59

Ease of development

The gain is small in your context, so the "fun" and "ease" that semantic web elements offer may be the main reason.

I prefer coding and maintaning an application like this:

<nav>
    ...
</nav>
<article>
    <h2>Article's title</h2>
</article>

than:

<div class="navigation">
    ...
</div>
<div class="article">
    <h2>Article's title</h2>
</div>

It's even better when using CSS selectors:

$("nav").show();
$("article figure")...

Update

Also, you can use specific functionalities that may be useful in your context, for example:

  • audio/video integration

  • time tags (open a date in a calendar)

Example:

<time datetime="1982-07-18">Priyanka Chopra’s birthday</time>
  • locations (some browser could offer to open a map or give directions)

Example:

<location lat=51.502064 long=-0.131981>London SW1A 4WW</location>
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Agreed using semantic tags, will make coding fund and also put things in perspective for a developer as to what it is they are coding. –  tech20nn Jun 8 '12 at 21:57

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