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Okay, I have a single table like this:

id  query  results  ip
---------------------------------
1   milk   17       10.10.10.1
2   milk   17       10.10.10.1
3   milk   17       10.10.10.2
4   bread  8        10.10.10.2
5   bread  8        10.10.10.2
6   cheese 12       10.10.10.1

I have this query right now:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt, query, results, ip
FROM table
GROUP BY query
ORDER BY results ASC
LIMIT 20

This query returns these results:

count  query  results
---------------------
2      bread  8
1      cheese 12
3      milk   17

I need to expand on that query (or redo it completely) to return something like this, preferably with the IP's in a nested array as part of the query's array:

query  count  results  ip
--------------------------------
bread  2      8        10.10.10.2 (2)
cheese 1      12       10.10.10.1 (1)
milk   3      17       10.10.10.1 (2)
                       10.10.10.2 (1)

I'll be outputting this with php, attaching the IP list with that count to the query count display (click to show/hide a modal with the info populated).

Any direction or help to get the data I need out would be wonderful!

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You mean DISTINCT right ? :-) –  Luc M Jun 8 '12 at 19:59
    
The desired result set violates 1NF. You may want to think of a better way of querying that. –  Kendall Frey Jun 8 '12 at 20:00
    
Probably SQL join to itself? –  Видул Петров Jun 8 '12 at 20:04
    
@LucM - er, yes - fixed. Kendall - the result set isn't a table, so I don't think 1NF applies. Correct me if I'm wrong, though - it happens more than I'd like to admit. –  SickHippie Jun 8 '12 at 20:16
    
See the existing answers with multiple group by columns. –  Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan Jun 8 '12 at 20:30
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer to this (despite numerous claims to the contrary) is "Yes you can, with a derived table":

SELECT
  SUM(cnt) as cnt,
  query, results,
  GROUP_CONCAT(ip SEPARATOR '\n') AS ip
FROM (
  SELECT
    query, results,
    COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt,
    CONCAT(ip, '(', COUNT(ip), ')') AS ip
  FROM test
  GROUP BY query, ip
) t
GROUP BY query
ORDER BY results ASC
LIMIT 20

Sample...

The one thing you cannot do is have PHP understand that the value of ip is an array with no other interference. However, you could do this slightly nasty thing to dynamically construct the data into JSON, and then it can simply be passed to json_decode() in PHP to easily convert it to a PHP vector type.

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This is brilliant, thank you! –  SickHippie Jun 8 '12 at 21:37
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No, you can't get that result. You have two options:

  1. Get each IP address on its own row and loop intelligently through the results in PHP.

  2. Use the GROUP_CONCAT() MySQL function to concatenate the IP addresses together in one field and parse the field to separate them in PHP.

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It won't be a nested array, but you could have something like

SELECT query, results, ip, COUNT(ip) AS cnt
FROM table
GROUP BY query, ip
ORDER BY results ASC
LIMIT 20

where you group on query AND ip

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1  
Sass me for the hoopy frood I am... I know you really don't care but I just had to show off to someone who's opinion I actually respect :-D –  DaveRandom Jun 8 '12 at 20:48
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Something like this might be what you need:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt, query, results, ip
FROM table
GROUP BY query, ip
ORDER BY results ASC
LIMIT 20

This would give you a result like this:

query   count  results  ip
----------------------------------
bread   2      8        10.10.10.2
cheese  1      12       10.10.10.1
milk    2      17       10.10.10.1
milk    1      17       10.10.10.2

Unfortunately, you can't use a nested array, but this is fairly close.

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group_concat() will work well for this. But remember to use distinct(ip) inside group_concat().

The following is a working query from mysql which I tried.

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt, query, results, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT(ip)) 
FROM table
GROUP BY query 
ORDER BY results ASC LIMIT 20;

+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------+
| cnt | query  | results | group_concat(distinct(ip)) |
+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------+
|   2 | bread  |       8 | 10.10.10.2                 |
|   1 | cheese |      12 | 10.10.10.1                 |
|   3 | milk   |      17 | 10.10.10.1,10.10.10.2      |
+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------+

When I run the query without distinct(ip) inside group_concat:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt, query, results, group_concat(ip) 
FROM table 
GROUP BY query 
ORDER BY results ASC LIMIT 20;

+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------------+
| cnt | query  | results | group_concat(ip)                 |
+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------------+
|   2 | bread  |       8 | 10.10.10.2,10.10.10.2            |
|   1 | cheese |      12 | 10.10.10.1                       |
|   3 | milk   |      17 | 10.10.10.1,10.10.10.1,10.10.10.2 |
+-----+--------+---------+----------------------------------+
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You don't need the DISTINCT inside GROUP_CONCAT. –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 8 '12 at 20:24
    
Check updated answer. That's what I got. –  varunl Jun 8 '12 at 20:51
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Try this:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(id)) as cnt, query, results, GROUP_CONCAT(ip) AS ip
FROM table
GROUP BY query
ORDER BY results ASC
LIMIT 20

GROUP_CONCAT will combine the ip fields into a comma separated string.

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