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We have a common compiled code library that is only accessible to a number of advanced developers within our company. We build releases for it periodically, releasing a 'release' version for our dev, test environments and a debug release for developers to use.

Oddly, when I build the Debug release, references to the path of my project on my PC show up when another developer tries to use the Debug version of the DLL on their PC. I haven't worked extensively with compiling these DLLs, but I should be able to build a Debug release and give it to other developers to use within their projects, correct? Or is that not how it works?

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references to the path of my project on my PC show up when another developer tries to use the Debug version of the DLL on their PC. I haven't worked extensively with compiling these DLLs, but I should be able to build a Debug release and give it to other developers to use within their projects, correct? Or is that not how it works?

When you build a debug version, you're also building the .pdb, which contains the symbols required for debugging. This is going to include the file paths, line numbers, etc, and be based on the system where this library is built. That's why they see these paths.

That being said, this won't hurt anything - they can use the assemblies to debug, but won't be able to see the code itself when something happens, as they won't have the projects.

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Ahh... so it isn't possible for them to debug the DLL unless they build their own version of the DLL on their own machine? –  jlrolin Jun 8 '12 at 20:40
    
@jlrolin THey'll have to browse tot he file locally every time they need to debug that dll. They can use it to debug other software fine, though. –  Reed Copsey Jun 8 '12 at 20:44

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