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I have a function that reads from the console using readPassword(). This function is called several times in one program iteration. However, I keep getting a java io exception once it gets to the readPassword() line. I noticed when i removed the close() statement from the finally-clause this error disappears. Why does this happen and when should I properly close the reader?

public void Func()
{
        Console console = System.console();
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        if (console == null)
            System.out.println("Error!");

        try 
        {
           char[] pwd = console.readPassword();
           String password = new String(pwd);
           System.out.println("PW: " + password);

           String input = reader.readLine();
           System.out.println("UserNm: " + input);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("IO EXCEPTION");
        } finally {
            if (reader != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    reader.close();
                }
                catch (IOException e)
                {
                    System.out.println("error");
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
}

Thanks in advance for the help!

share|improve this question
1  
Exception messages are very useful when debugging. As in: e.printStackTrace(); – jsn Jun 8 '12 at 21:11
    
Thanks for the suggestion :) I do regularly print out the stacktrace in my actual code. This is just a stub. – user459811 Jun 8 '12 at 21:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need any reader here, just use the Console instance.

public String Func() {
        Console console = System.console();
        if (console == null)
            throw new IllegalStateException("No console available");

        try {
           String username = console.readLine("Username: ");
           String pwd = new String(console.readPassword("Password: "));
           return pwd;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
}

Edited with your question edit. Just use the Console class, it can read/write, you don't need any reader/writer.

share|improve this answer

There's only one console, and there's only one System.in. If you close it, then you can't read from it anymore! You don't need to close that BufferedReader, nor should you. That whole finally block can and should just go away.

On closer reading, I don't even see why you're creating the BufferedReader in the first place -- it seems to have no function. Just delete all the code that deals with it!

share|improve this answer
    
Even if I access System.console() again each time the function is called? This is probably bad practice on my part. If I don't close it can I count on garbage collection to handle it for me? – user459811 Jun 8 '12 at 21:16
    
Garbage collection won't close it, because it should not be closed, is my point. You can call System.console() as many times as you like without worry. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 8 '12 at 21:17
    
Sorry about that. I re-edited my original post. I was using the BufferedReader to read in a username and the Console to read in password since Console has access to the handy readPassword() func. – user459811 Jun 8 '12 at 21:21

Use something like java.util.Scanner instead and as other people say don't worry about ever trying to close system.in.

So much cleaner:

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
String password  = in.nextLine(); 
String username  = in.nextLine();

No tidy up/exception handling required.

share|improve this answer
    
@alex's answer is nicer because of the readPassword bit. Not storing it as a string and suppressing output of the text – plasma147 Jun 9 '12 at 6:40

You should not close your Console. Keep it open until your program does no longer need to read from it.

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