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I've sometimes seen code written like this :

public class B1
{
}

public class B2
{
    private B1 b1;

    public B1 B1
    {
        get { return b1; }
        set { b1 = value; }
    }
}

i.e. class B2 has a property named "B1", which is also of type "B1".

My gut instinct tells me this is not a good idea, but are there any technical reasons why you should avoid giving a property the same name as its class ?

(I'm using .net 2.0, in case that matters).

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I believe that the .NET framework design guidelines recommends this naming convention as well. –  NotDan Jul 8 '09 at 2:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 33 down vote accepted

It's fine. The canonical example here is

public Background {
    public Color Color { get; set; }
}

There are rare issues (corner cases) that come up here, but not enough to warrant avoiding this device. Frankly, I find this device quite useful. I would not enjoy not being able to do the following:

class Ticker { ... }


public StockQuote {
    public Ticker Ticker { get; set; }
}

I don't want to have to say Ticker StockTicker or Ticker ThisTicker etc.

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1  
What are the corner cases? –  Brian R. Bondy Dec 8 '09 at 18:15
1  
class A { public static void Method(int i) { } public void Method(object o) { } } and class B { A A { get; set; } public B() { A = new A(); A.Method(0); } }. Is A.Method calling the static method named Method or is it calling the instance method named Method? (In C# it turns out that it will call the static method. However, if you replace the 0 in A.Method(0) by "Hello, world!" it will call the instance method. Note that Intellisense doesn't pick this up and will highlight the A in A.Method("Hello, world!") blue as if it were the static method.) –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 19:19
1  
And this is merely to point out that there can be (rare) cases wherein the intent of the code using this pattern is not crystal clear (there is, of course, always an unambiguous interpretation based on the language specification). –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 19:19
    
@jason Properties I agree, but objects why? Don't you want to distinguish your static (class) method calls from your instance calls? If you have one object, I see no reason for A = new A(), just do a = new A(). It is no more onerus but much clearer. Your edge case concerns objects, not properties. However you closed the question concerning objects. In VB, intellisense and renaming do not distinguish between class and instance references when object and class are the same name. But renaming properties with same name as the type is no problem. –  Jason S Aug 25 '11 at 4:07
    
@Jason See this question for problems to do with renaming in VB projects, when objects are named the same as their class. This does not apply to properties, but my question about naming objects the same as their class, was closed as a duplicate of this one. –  Jason S Aug 25 '11 at 4:58

I can only think of one drawback. If you wanted to do something like this:

public class B1
{
        public static void MyFunc(){ ; }
}

public class B2
{
        private B1 b1;

        public B1 B1
        {
                get { return b1; }
                set { b1 = value; }
        }

        public void Foo(){
                B1.MyFunc();
        }
}

You'd have to instead use:

MyNamespace.B1.MyFunc();

A good example of this is common usage is in Winforms programming, where the System.Windows.Forms.Cursor class overlaps with the System.Windows.Forms.Form.Cursor property, so your form events have to access static members using the full namespace.

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Just today, Eric blogged about the 'Color Color' problem.

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/07/06/color-color.aspx

Personally, I would avoid it if possible.

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3  
Why? I don't see any harm to it. –  Steven Sudit Jul 8 '09 at 1:24
1  
@StevenSudit IMO it adds complexity for the programmer (after all, you need to read that article to understand what's going on), and we programmers know how bad & error-prone that is. I'd avoid it too. –  MasterMastic Nov 29 '12 at 20:09

There's no specific technical problem with it. It might harm or improve readability. In fact, some Microsoft libraries have these kind of properties (specifically, with enum properties, this usually makes sense).

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Another gotcha is with inner types.

I run into this one all the time:

public class Car {
    public enum Make {
        Chevy,
        Ford
    };

    // No good, need to pull Make out of the class or create
    // a name that isn't exactly what you want
    public Make Make {
        get; set;
    }
}
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3  
Which is why I pluralise my enum names. There are several possible Makes of car, but this car has only one Make. It doesn't always read the best, but I look at is as the enum being a list of possible Makes. –  Hand-E-Food Aug 25 '11 at 3:03

The Microsoft Naming Guideline for Members state:

Consider giving a property the same name as its type.

When you have a property that is strongly typed to an enumeration, the name of the property can be the same as the name of the enumeration. For example, if you have an enumeration named CacheLevel, a property that returns one of its values can also be named CacheLevel.

Though I admit there is a little ambiguity whether they are just recommending this for Enums or for properties in general.

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It can obviously be a bit confusing when the name of a property and it's type are the same, but other than that it's not really a problem.

If the name makes sense, it's usually better to let the name and the type be the same. If you can think of a better name, you should of course use that, but you should not try to make up a name at any cost just to avoid this situation.

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This common pattern is one of the reasons why I always use this when referring to an instance member within a class. e.g. always

this.SomeMethod(this.SomeProperty);

and never

SomeMethod(SomeProperty);

In most cases, there isn't any actual ambiguity, but I find it helps clarify things. Plus you now know where the property/method is defined.

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I give things the same name as their type, except for case: my methods and properties are "lowerCase"; and I therefore wouldn't have the problem that MiffTheFox has.

public class B1
{
    public static void myFunc(){ ; }
}

public class B2
{
    private B1 m_b1;

    public B1 b1
    {
        get { return m_b1; }
        set { m_b1 = value; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        B1.myFunc(); //this is Ok, no need to use namespace
    }
}

So for me, m_b1 is member data, b1 is a property (or a local variable or parameter), and B1 is the name of the class.

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2  
Unfortunately using lower-case for Properties and Methods is in direct conflict with the accepted naming guidelines for C#. –  Timothy Walters Jul 8 '09 at 2:10
    
Yes. They're inferior guidelines, IMO, don't you agree? Why did they come to be? –  ChrisW Jul 8 '09 at 2:31

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