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I'm trying to encrypt a string and write it to a binary file. I want to do the process in reverse. Here is the code I have but it doesn't work.

FileStream stream = new FileStream(saveFileDialog1.OpenFile().ToString(),   FileMode.Create);
BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream);
String temp = "";
serialList.ForEach(delegate(record p)
{ 
    temp = String.Format("{0},{1}#", p.serial, p.option);
    byte[] dataB = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(String.Format("{0},{1}#", p.serial, p.option));
    byte[] enc = Encrypt(dataB, "gio!");
    writer.Write(enc);
});
writer.Write('1');
writer.Close();
stream.Close();

What is wrong with it??

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What does it do? –  zmbq Jun 8 '12 at 22:31
    
@zmbq: Creates an empty file, like the question says. –  Kendall Frey Jun 8 '12 at 22:31
    
You don't even get the '1' ? –  zmbq Jun 8 '12 at 22:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

SaveFileDialog.OpenFile already returns you Stream object. You don't need strange .ToString() call that may or may not give you file name/complete file path.

Essentially your code creates 2 streams: one at location specified in FileOpenDialog, and another - somewhere at relative path with file name equal to result of "Stream.ToString()". First stream (the one you likely looking at) will be empty, as you are not writing anything to it.

Note: consider using using(...) instead of manual .Close calls as it creates safer code (you'll not leave stream non-disposed in case of an exception).

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Before closing the stream, flush it, like this.

writer.Flush();
writer.Close();

Alternatively, you can set writer.AutoFlush to true before you begin writing, but that may be slightly slower.

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2  
+0. Reasonable advice, but no-op: Close performs Flush. Same as calling Dispose with using (which would make for better code in this case). –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 8 '12 at 22:37
    
@AlexeiLevenkov: I wondered about that, but the code given suggests it is not being flushed. Interesting. –  Kendall Frey Jun 8 '12 at 22:39

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