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The assignment given by our teacher was to create a program that asked for asked for two integers x and y and one character z. The letter entered for z could be a and it would add the two integers, s would subtract them, m multiply and d divide.

The teacher tried to explain multiple 'if' 'else' statements in class; however, I'm afraid I cannot make heads or tails of where the missing '{' is. If someone who better understands this could explain why and where the missing '{' is that would be greatly appreciated.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
char let;
int x;
int y;
int a;
int s;
int m;
int d;

printf("Enter command letter \n");
scanf("%c", &let);

printf("Enter both integers \n");
scanf("%d%d%c", &x, &y);

if (let==a)
{
    a=x+y;
    printf("x+y is %d \n", a);
}

else
{
    if (let==s)
    {
            s=x-y;
            printf("x-y is %d \n", s);
    }

    else
    {
             if (let==m)
            {
                    m=x*y;
                    printf("x*y is %d \n", m);
            }

    else
    {
                    d=x/y;
                    printf("x/y is %d \n", d);
    }
}

return(0);

}
share|improve this question
    
Added the corrected version for you, it's really simple as you'll find –  Nicolás Torres Jun 8 '12 at 23:04
    
Which system are you using? Doesn't your editor provide you with a way to find the matching } for an {? Doesn't it provide automatic indentation? –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 8 '12 at 23:08
1  
Unrelated problem: You compare if (let==a) (and similar for s,m,d), that means you compare the scanned letter to the uninitialised variable int a;. You should compare if (let == 'a') to the character constant 'a' (etc.). –  Daniel Fischer Jun 8 '12 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

It's the typical indent problem.

One thing you know for sure is that you can't have two 'else's for the same IF. If you follow your code you'll see:

    if (let==s)
    {
            s=x-y;
            printf("x-y is %d \n", s);
    }

    else
    {
             if (let==m)
            {
                    m=x*y;
                    printf("x*y is %d \n", m);
            }

    else
    {
                    d=x/y;
                    printf("x/y is %d \n", d);
    }

This is wrong.

Now the corrected version

    if (let==s)
    {
            s=x-y;
            printf("x-y is %d \n", s);
    }

    else
    {
             if (let==m)
            {
                    m=x*y;
                    printf("x*y is %d \n", m);
            }

            else //REINDENTED THIS ELSE, AND THE ERROR BECOMES VISIBLE
            {
                    d=x/y;
                    printf("x/y is %d \n", d);
            }

     }//THIS IS THE ONE MISSING
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, great thank you for the explanation! I understand what your pointing out. Idk why the rest of the script didn't show but, either way now I know what to look for! thanks again –  user1445502 Jun 8 '12 at 23:07
    
I just wanted to make things simple for you, the rest of the code is okay :) –  Nicolás Torres Jun 8 '12 at 23:09

You have two } else { blocks.

You need to have only one } else { block that is executed only if every if (...) { and } else if (...) { isn't run.

For example:

int x = 4;

if (x == 1) {
  // Do stuff
} else if (x == 2) {
  // Do stuff because x isn't 1
} else if (x == 3) {
  // Do stuff because x isn't 1 or 2
} else {
  // Do stuff because x isn't 1, 2 or 3
}
share|improve this answer

The last else belongs to

if (let==m)

so the next } closes the previous else, and the main() is missing its closing }

It is generally best to keep the if/else pairs indented to the same level to avoid these mistakes

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, cool. Thank you! –  user1445502 Jun 8 '12 at 23:09

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