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Is it true that in JavaScript functions return objects other than Boolean and Numbers by reference?

How is it possible when those objects destroyed when the function those belong to terminates?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Objects are not destroyed until all references to them are gone and garbage collected. When the object is returned, the calling code gains a reference to it, and the object is not garbage collected.

Technically, the called function's stack frame is destroyed when it returns. The object, however, is not on the stack, but on the heap. The function's local reference to the object is on the stack, and is therefore destroyed, but the calling code's reference isn't destroyed until some time later.

As a side note, it isn't really important how it is returned, because the function can't use the object anyway after it returns.

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The activation record itself may persist when the function returns, if the function affected its outer scope in such a way as to expose a reference to it. That is, if a function instantiates a function, and that function references the local scope (the activation record, or "stack frame" - which it really isn't), and that function is returned or assigned to some relatively-global variable or property, then the activation record remains available and is not collected. –  Pointy Jun 8 '12 at 23:09

Is it true that in JavaScript functions return objects other than Boolean and Numbers by reference?

It is true, objects in JavaScript are always passed by reference

How is it possible when those objects destroyed when the function those belong to terminates?

Only references are destroyed, not the values itself. And as long as there are no references left, the object is a candidate to be garbage-collected.

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Two great answers there, but just thought I should add that it's easy enough to test:

function modify(arg) {
    arg.modified = true;
}
test = 4;
modify(test);
console.log(test.modified); // undefined
test = {};
modify(test);
console.log(test.modified); // true
test = "";
modify(test);
console.log(test.modified); // undefined

where undefined means it has been copied instead of being passed by reference. Note that strings aren't passed by reference either.

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