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I have a database table with about 1M records. I need to find all duplicate names in this table and make them unique.

For example...

Id   Name
-----------
1    A
2    A
3    B
4    C
5    C

Should be changed to...

Id   Name
-----------
1    A-1
2    A-2
3    B
4    C-1
5    C-2

Is there an effective way of doing this with a mysql query or procedure?

Thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

this is a little tricky.. I tested on my local host and it does what you want.. let me know if you have any questions. SQL FIDDLE

UPDATE temp t1, 
(
    SELECT 
        id as unique_id, 
        new_name 
    FROM(
        SELECT
          id,
          IF(@ROW = Name, @COUNT, @COUNT := 1),
          CONCAT(Name, ' - ', @COUNT) AS new_name,
          @ROW := Name,
          @COUNT := @COUNT + 1
        FROM temp
        JOIN (SELECT @COUNT := 0, @ROW := "") AS t
        WHERE Name IN(SELECT Name FROM temp
        GROUP BY Name
        HAVING COUNT(Name) > 1)
    ) AS temp_test
) as testing
SET t1.Name = testing.new_name where t1.id = testing.unique_id

Final output looks like this: PICTURE


EDIT: This may work better for performance sake

1. FIRST RUN THIS QUERY

SET SESSION group_concat_max_len = 1000000;  -- longer if needed
SET @query1 := (
SELECT 
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT unique_name) 
FROM temp
JOIN(
    select Name as unique_name
    FROM temp
    GROUP BY name
    HAVING COUNT(Name) > 1
) as t
);

2. THEN RUN THIS UPDATE

UPDATE temp t1, 
(
    SELECT 
        id as unique_id, 
        new_name 
    FROM(
        SELECT
          id,
          IF(@ROW = Name, @COUNT, @COUNT := 1),
          CONCAT(Name, ' - ', @COUNT) AS new_name,
          @ROW := Name,
          @COUNT := @COUNT + 1
        FROM temp
        JOIN (SELECT @COUNT := 0, @ROW := "") AS t
        WHERE FIND_IN_SET (`name`, @query1)
    ) AS temp_test
) as testing
SET t1.Name = testing.new_name where t1.id = testing.unique_id

I tested this on my local and it works so you should be able to get this to run :)

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thank you but it is painfully slow (tested without update, just the select, over 10 mins for a 10k dataset), is there room for improvement on this? also please include the "UPDATE" syntax –  Sharky Jun 28 '14 at 11:35
    
@Sharky Im sorry I thought I had included the update syntax.. i just did. to do this specific thing from what I can think of this is going to be as fast as pretty much any other method... since its updating the table just once it shouldn't be that bad. meaning its running once to change the database so if it takes a bit longer than hoped for it should be ok. i'll look at trying to optimize the query.. if you could post an EXPLAIN of the query so we can see how you have it indexed that would help a lot thanks –  John Ruddell Jun 28 '14 at 18:20
    
thanks for the reply, ill take a look tomorrow and accept this :D yes, i also dont believe there is room for improvement because for every updated row a new select must be done. index exist on id, and does not exist on name. so selects are fast, and updates do not rebuild any index. –  Sharky Jun 29 '14 at 8:04
    
@Sharky one thing you could do is do that sub select once before the update query and assign it to a user defined variable and then put that variable inside the IN() ... I'm on my phone so it won't be easy to write the code.. I'll be back at my desktop later today if you want to wait... I think I can get that to work and it would be a lot faster :) –  John Ruddell Jun 29 '14 at 14:39
    
@Sharky ok i just updated my answer with a way to do the select for duplicate names once and then plug that into your update query.. hopefully that will be faster :) let me know how it works! :D –  John Ruddell Jun 29 '14 at 23:59
UPDATE    table_x AS upd
    SET   upd.Name = CONCAT(upd.Name, '-', upd.Id)
    WHERE upd.id IN(
                    SELECT    sel.id
                        FROM  table_x AS sel
                        WHERE sel.Name = upd.Name
                          AND sel.Id != upd.Id
                 );
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2  
Sorry, I think I forgot to mention that the new unique name, for security purposes, may not include the id. The name must be appended with a sequential number starting with 1 for each set of duplicates. –  gunner1095 Jul 8 '12 at 18:15

First you should store duplicate Id in a temporary table.


Drop temporary table if not exist temp;

Create temporary table temp (
Select max(id)'id' from table_x group by Name having count(*)>1
);

Delete from table_x as x,temp as t where x.id = t.id;

Just do this repeatedly... U will get unique rows after that set unique key to name field..

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