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Can anyone explain why I am getting this error?

Here is a stack class I implemented using a doubly linked list:

import java.util.Iterator;

public class Stack<Item> implements Iterable<Item>{

private Node first;
private int N;

private class Node{
    private Node next;
    private Node prev;
    private Item item;
}

public Iterator<Item> iterator(){
    return new ReverseIterator<Item>();
}    

private class ReverseIterator<Item> implements Iterator<Item>{
    private Node x;

    private ReverseIterator(){
        if (first != null)
           x = first.prev;
    }

    public boolean hasNext(){
        return x != null;
    }

    public Item next(){
        Item i = x.item;
        x = x.prev;
        return i;
    }

    public void remove(){
    }
}

public void push(Item i){
    if (isEmpty()){
        first = new Node();
        first.item = i;
        first.next = first;
        first.prev = first;
    }
    else{
        Node x = new Node();
        x.item = i;
        x.next = first;
        x.prev = first.prev;
        first.prev.next = x;
        first.prev = x;
    }
    N++;
}

public Item pop(){
    assert !isEmpty() : "Stack is empty";

    Item i = first.prev.item;
    if (N == 1)
        first = null;
    else{
        first.prev.prev.next = first;
        first.prev = first.prev.prev;
    }

    N--;    
    return i;
}

public boolean isEmpty(){
    return N == 0;
}

public int size(){
    return N;
}

public static void main(String[] args){

}
}

The compiler says there's an error in Item i = x.item;, expected Item, found Item. The solution was to replace ReverseIterator<Item> with ReverseIterator. Can someone explain why I got the error I did by adding <Item>?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just because you used the same name for the type variable (Item) does not mean that it represents the same generic type.

If you declare a nested class N<T>, inside a generic class C<T>, the T from C<T> is effectively hidden from the body of N<T>. It is exactly the same principle as declaring a class level field called x and declaring a method parameter in that class, also called x. Your innermost declaring scope hides anything from the outside.

If ReverseIterator were a static nested class, you would be obliged to add the <Item> to its declaration, because instances of it would not have an enclosing instance of Stack<Item>. And the same error would result, even though in this case there would be no hiding going on. In fact, you would need to add the type variable to Node as well.

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Snap! And I think you describe it better. –  OldCurmudgeon Jun 9 '12 at 0:30

Your problem is here:

private class ReverseIterator<Item> implements Iterator<Item>{

Here you are defining an inner class dealing with objects of type Item but this type is not the same type as the Item type of the enclosing Stack class. As a result, when you do the Item i = x.item; x.item is of type Stack.Item (sort of) while i is of type Stack.ReverseIterator.Item.

You have two options, one is to do as you have done and make the inner class use the same Item type as the outer or you could make the inner class static and hold its own inner Item type (although in this case I would recommend using a different name for the inner type or you will find yourself confused again).

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Try like this:

import java.util.Iterator;

public class Stack<Item> implements Iterable<Item> {

    private Node first;
    private int N;

    private class Node {
        private Node next;
        private Node prev;
        private Item item;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Item> iterator() {
        return new ReverseIterator();
    }

    private class ReverseIterator implements Iterator<Item> {
        private Node x;

        private ReverseIterator() {
            if (first != null) {
                x = first.prev;
            }
        }

        public boolean hasNext() {
            return x != null;
        }

        public Item next() {
            Item i = x.item;
            x = x.prev;
            return i;
        }

        public void remove() {
        }
    }

    public void push(final Item i) {
        if (isEmpty()) {
            first = new Node();
            first.item = i;
            first.next = first;
            first.prev = first;
        } else {
            Node x = new Node();
            x.item = i;
            x.next = first;
            x.prev = first.prev;
            first.prev.next = x;
            first.prev = x;
        }
        N++;
    }

    public Item pop() {
        assert !isEmpty() : "Stack is empty";

        Item i = first.prev.item;
        if (N == 1) {
            first = null;
        } else {
            first.prev.prev.next = first;
            first.prev = first.prev.prev;
        }

        N--;
        return i;
    }

    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return N == 0;
    }

    public int size() {
        return N;
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) {

    }
}
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