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I have a user control that as shown below, for a master detail sort of display. A typical MVVM architecture with a base view model that comes complete with a CloseCommand.

I am trying to scope a KeyBinding that will execute the close command on a TabItem, and just can't get it to work.

Interestingly, I can get it to work if I put the binding on the PersonDetailView (one of two possible USerControls that the TabControl might display, as shown below), but it should be on the TabControl or the Border that contains it.

Any suggestions?

Cheers,
Berryl

UserControl

<Grid>

    <ListBox Style="{StaticResource ListBoxStyle}" />

    <GridSplitter 
        HorizontalAlignment="Right" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" Grid.Column="1" 
        ResizeBehavior="PreviousAndNext" Width="5" Background="#FFBCBCBC" KeyboardNavigation.IsTabStop="False"
                  />

    <Border Grid.Column="2" Background="{StaticResource headerBrush}">

        // ** THIS is the scope I want, but it doesn't work
        <Border.InputBindings>
            <KeyBinding Key="F4" Modifiers="Control" Command="{Binding CloseCommand}"/>
        </Border.InputBindings>

        <TabControl Style="{StaticResource TabControlStyle}" >

            <TabControl.Resources>                   
                <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type personVm:PersonDetailVm}">
                    <local:PersonDetailView />
                </DataTemplate>
                <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type orgVm:OrganizationDetailVm}">
                    <local:OrganizationDetailView />
                </DataTemplate>
            </TabControl.Resources>

        </TabControl>
    </Border>

</Grid>

TabItem style

<Style x:Key="OrangeTabItemStyle" TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}">
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}">
                <Border AllowDrop="true" ToolTip="{Binding DisplayName}">
                    <Border Name="Border" Background="Transparent" BorderBrush="Transparent" BorderThickness="1,1,1,0" CornerRadius="2,2,0,0">
                        <DockPanel x:Name="TitlePanel" TextElement.Foreground="{StaticResource FileTabTextBrush}">
                            <ctrl:GlyphButton 

                                // ** This works as expected
                                Command="{Binding CloseCommand}" CommandParameter="{Binding}"
                                >
                            </ctrl:GlyphButton>

                        </DockPanel>
                    </Border>

                    // ** Can't get it to work from here either **
                    <Border.InputBindings>
                        <KeyBinding Command="{Binding CloseCommand}" Key="F4" Modifiers="Control" />
                    </Border.InputBindings>
                </Border>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

UPDATE

I am at a loss to set the RoutedCommand in my style

<Style x:Key="OrangeTabItemStyle" TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}">
    <Setter Property="beh:RoutedCommandWire.RoutedCommand" Value="F4"/> **** ?? ****
    <Setter Property="beh:RoutedCommandWire.ICommand" Value="{Binding CloseCommand}"/>
</Style>

Here is what I think the answer code looks like in C#

public class RoutedCommandWire
{

    public static readonly DependencyProperty RoutedCommandProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("RoutedCommand", typeof(RoutedCommand), typeof(RoutedCommandWire), new PropertyMetadata(OnCommandChanged));

    public static RoutedCommand GetRoutedCommand(DependencyObject d) { return (RoutedCommand) d.GetValue(RoutedCommandProperty); }
    public static void SetRoutedCommand(DependencyObject d, RoutedCommand value) { d.SetValue(RoutedCommandProperty, value); }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ICommandProperty = 
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Iommand", typeof(ICommand), typeof(RoutedCommandWire));

    public static ICommand GetICommand(DependencyObject d) { return (ICommand) d.GetValue(ICommandProperty); }
    public static void SetICommand(DependencyObject d, ICommand value) { d.SetValue(ICommandProperty, value); }

    private static void OnCommandChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) {
        var fe = d as FrameworkElement;
        if(fe==null) return;

        if (e.OldValue != null) {
            Detach(fe, (RoutedCommand) e.OldValue);
        }
        if (e.NewValue != null) {
            Attach(fe, (RoutedCommand) e.NewValue, Execute, CanExecute);
        }
    }

    private static void CanExecute(object sender, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e) {
        var depObj = sender as DependencyObject;
        if (depObj == null) return;

        var command = GetICommand(depObj);
        if (command == null) return;

        e.CanExecute = command.CanExecute(e.Parameter);
        e.Handled = true;
    }

    private static void Execute(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var depObj = sender as DependencyObject;
        if (depObj == null) return;

        var command = GetICommand(depObj);
        if (command == null) return;

        command.Execute(e.Parameter);
        e.Handled = true;
    }

    public static void Detach(FrameworkElement fe, RoutedCommand command) {
        var bindingCollection = fe.CommandBindings;
        if (bindingCollection.Count == 0) return;

        var matches = bindingCollection.Cast<CommandBinding>().Where(binding => binding.Equals(command));
        foreach (var binding in matches) {
            bindingCollection.Remove(binding);
        }
    }

    public static void Attach(FrameworkElement fe, RoutedCommand command, 
        ExecutedRoutedEventHandler executedHandler, CanExecuteRoutedEventHandler canExecuteHandler, bool preview = false)
    {
        if (command == null || executedHandler == null) return;

        var binding = new CommandBinding(command);
        if (preview)
        {
            binding.PreviewExecuted += executedHandler;
            if (canExecuteHandler != null)
            {
                binding.PreviewCanExecute += canExecuteHandler;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            binding.Executed += executedHandler;
            if (canExecuteHandler != null)
            {
                binding.CanExecute += canExecuteHandler;
            }
        }
        fe.CommandBindings.Add(binding);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Which class has the CloseCommand property? –  user128300 Jun 9 '12 at 7:11
    
I think you'll find a solution here stackoverflow.com/questions/10365582/… –  Phil Jun 9 '12 at 7:51
    
@fmunkett. All of my view models do, although the ones of interest here are the PersonDetailVm and OrganizationDetailVm. Cheers –  Berryl Jun 9 '12 at 14:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

KeyBindings work only on controls which accept keyboard input. A Border doesn't. In general, InputBindings are also different from CommandBindings in that you can define a CommandBinding on a parent element so it handles commands when child elements have focus, but you can't define InputBindings on parent elements in order to have them effective on the child elements.

What you can do is to add a default InputGesture to your command's InputGestures collection. That seems to make the command available using that keyboard shortcut from every control that accepts keyboard input (that's much better than to have to specify InputBindings everywhere, isn't it?). In order to take advantage of this, you would have to use a RoutedCommand to invoke your MVVM-ICommand. You can combine the two using attached properties, in a pattern which I call "sticky command" and which is very similar to an attached behaviour.

This code defines the attached properties:

    Public Class Close

    Public Shared ReadOnly CommandProperty As DependencyProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Command", GetType(RoutedCommand), GetType(Close), New PropertyMetadata(AddressOf OnCommandChanged))
    Public Shared Function GetCommand(ByVal d As DependencyObject) As RoutedCommand
        Return d.GetValue(CommandProperty)
    End Function
    Public Shared Sub SetCommand(ByVal d As DependencyObject, ByVal value As RoutedCommand)
        d.SetValue(CommandProperty, value)
    End Sub

    Public Shared ReadOnly MVVMCommandProperty As DependencyProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("MVVMCommand", GetType(ICommand), GetType(Close))
    Public Shared Function GetMVVMCommand(ByVal d As DependencyObject) As ICommand
        Return d.GetValue(MVVMCommandProperty)
    End Function
    Public Shared Sub SetMVVMCommand(ByVal d As DependencyObject, ByVal value As ICommand)
        d.SetValue(MVVMCommandProperty, value)
    End Sub


    Private Shared Sub OnCommandChanged(ByVal d As DependencyObject, ByVal e As DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
        If e.OldValue IsNot Nothing Then
            Detach(d, DirectCast(e.OldValue, RoutedCommand))
        End If
        If e.NewValue IsNot Nothing Then
             Attach(d, DirectCast(e.NewValue, RoutedCommand), AddressOf DoCloseCommand, AddressOf CanDoCloseCommand)
        End If
    End Sub

    Private Shared Sub CanDoCloseCommand(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs)
        If sender IsNot Nothing Then
            Dim com As ICommand = GetMVVMCommand(sender)
            If com IsNot Nothing Then
                e.CanExecute = com.CanExecute(e.Parameter)
                e.Handled = True
            End If
        End If
    End Sub

    Private Shared Sub DoCloseCommand(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As ExecutedRoutedEventArgs)
        If sender IsNot Nothing Then
            Dim com As ICommand = GetMVVMCommand(sender)
            If com IsNot Nothing Then
                com.Execute(e.Parameter)
                e.Handled = True
            End If
        End If
    End Sub

    Public Shared Sub Detach(ByVal base As FrameworkElement, ByVal command As RoutedCommand)
        Dim commandBindings As CommandBindingCollection = base.CommandBindings
        If commandBindings IsNot Nothing Then
            Dim bindings = From c As CommandBinding In commandBindings
                           Where c.Command Is command
                           Select c
            Dim bindingList As New List(Of CommandBinding)(bindings)
            For Each c As CommandBinding In bindingList
                commandBindings.Remove(c)
            Next
        End If
    End Sub

    Public Shared Sub Attach(ByVal base As FrameworkElement, ByVal command As RoutedCommand, ByVal executedHandler As ExecutedRoutedEventHandler, ByVal canExecuteHandler As CanExecuteRoutedEventHandler, Optional ByVal preview As Boolean = False)
        If command IsNot Nothing And executedHandler IsNot Nothing Then
            Dim b As CommandBinding = New CommandBinding(command)
            If preview Then
                AddHandler b.PreviewExecuted, executedHandler
                If canExecuteHandler IsNot Nothing Then
                    AddHandler b.PreviewCanExecute, canExecuteHandler
                End If
            Else
                AddHandler b.Executed, executedHandler
                If canExecuteHandler IsNot Nothing Then
                    AddHandler b.CanExecute, canExecuteHandler
                End If
            End If
            base.CommandBindings.Add(b)
            'For Each i As InputGesture In command.InputGestures
            '    GetInputBindings(base).Add(New InputBinding(command, i))
            'Next
        End If
    End Sub

You'd use both of them on your TabItems, I guess, since that is where you want to handle the close command, and you would set Close.Command to a RoutedCommand which has the keyboard shortcut in its InputGestures, and Close.MVVMCommand="{Binding CloseCommand}".

UPDATE

You can define a RoutedCommand like this in your ViewModel:

Public Shared ReadOnly TestCommand As New RoutedUICommand("Test", "TestCommand", GetType(ViewModel))
Shared Sub New()
    TestCommand.InputGestures.Add(New KeyGesture(Key.T, ModifierKeys.Control))
End Sub

The static constructor sets the default keygesture for the command. If you want to do that in XAML, you could also do that using custom attached properties. Anyway, you'd reference the RoutedCommand like this in XAML:

Close.Command="{x:Static my:ViewModel.TestCommand}"
share|improve this answer
    
The first part about accepting input makes perfect sense, but not so sure about the menu. A context menu for the TabItem? –  Berryl Jun 9 '12 at 14:11
    
What is the property to look for to know if an element accepts keyboard input? Cheers –  Berryl Jun 9 '12 at 14:12
    
For number one: just tried it out again and noticed that the menu has nothing to do with it. It seemed so in my test project, but in fact, it is better... please see my corrected answer, and sorry... –  hbarck Jun 9 '12 at 19:55
    
For number two: I'm not sure, but I guess those which have Focusable=True by default should accept keyboard input. Panels, Borders and other layout-related elements usually don't. –  hbarck Jun 9 '12 at 20:43
    
Please see me edited post. I think I've translated your code well enough to try it but at a loss as how to set the RoutedCommand. Can you bring me all the way home here? Cheers –  Berryl Jun 10 '12 at 17:52

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