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Is it a WARRANTY, that offset of first element of structure is 0? To be more accurate, lets consider

struct foo {
int a;
double b;
};
struct foo *ptr=malloc(sizeof(struct foo));
int *int_ptr = &ptr->a;
free(int_ptr)

Is it garantied, that it is valid always, under any os or any other factors?

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Under any OS or any other factors? I don't know if that can be answered -- whether it is in the language specification is a different story. –  jedwards Jun 9 '12 at 5:23
    
Shouldn't your code read int *int_ptr = &ptr->a; ? –  lindelof Jun 9 '12 at 5:35
1  
Yes, corrected code. –  KAction Jun 9 '12 at 5:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes it is guaranteed. Will get you a standard quote, let me lookup.

C99 Standard: §6.7.2.1

Para 12

Within a structure object, the non-bit-field members and the units in which bit-fields reside have addresses that increase in the order in which they are declared. A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides), and vice versa. There may be unnamed padding within a structure object, but not at its beginning.

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1  
§6.7.2.15 seems about right: "A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides), and vice versa. There may be unnamed padding within a structure object, but not at its beginning." –  DCoder Jun 9 '12 at 5:27
    
@DCoder: Ah, You beat me to that :) –  Alok Save Jun 9 '12 at 5:29

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