Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am using Asp.Net/C# in my application.I am using Asp.Net Web Forms.I have a class file named Global.cs.In that class file I define variables using set get properties.I use those variables anywhere on any pages by instantiating that class object.

Here is my Global.cs file

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

/// <summary>
/// Contains my site's global variables.
/// </summary>
public static class Global
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Global variable storing important stuff.
    /// </summary>
    public static string gDate;
    public static string gMobLength;
    public static string gDateFormat;
    public static string gApplicationNo;
    public static string gBranchNo;
    public static string gMemId;
    public static string gIsEditable="false";
    public static string gLoggedInUserName;


    public static string ImportantData
    {
        get
        {
            return gDate;

        }
        set
        {
            gDate = value;

        }

    }
    public static string MobileLength
    {
        get
        {
            return gMobLength;
        }
        set
        {
            gMobLength = value;
        }
    }

    public static string DateFormat
    {
        get
        {
            return gDateFormat; 
        }
        set
        {
            gDateFormat = value; 
        }
    }
    public static string ApplicationNo
    {
        get
        {
            return gApplicationNo;
        }
        set
        {
            gApplicationNo = value; 
        }
    }
    public static string BranchNo
    {
        get
        {
            return gBranchNo; 
        }
        set
        {
            gBranchNo = value;
        }
    }

}

My Question to you guys is ,Is this a proper way of using variables throughout the project.What are the possible pros and cons with this approach.What approach you guys take for using Global variables. Any suggestions are welcome. Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, I'd recommend using autoimplemented properties.

public static string BranchNo { get; set; }

Simplifies your code a bit. As to whether or not this is a good approach, it depends. Sometimes simple and straight-forward is better, and this falls into that category. If the values should not change once initialized, you may want to use a proper singleton with initialization:

public class Settings
{
   private static Settings _current;
   private static readonly object _lock = new object();

   public static Settings Current
   {
      get
      {
         lock(_lock)
         {
            if (_current == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("Settings uninitialized");
            return _current;
         }
      }
      set
      {
          if (value == null) throw new ArgumentNullException();
          if (_settings != null) throw new InvalidOperationException("Current settings can only be set once.");

          if (_settings == null)
          {
              lock(_lock)
              {
                 if (_settings == null) _settings = value;
              }
          }
      }
   }


   public string ImportantData { get; private set; }

   // etc. 
}

Initializing settings:

Settings.Current = new Settings{ ImportantData = "blah blah blah"};

Accessing:

var data = Settings.Current.ImportantData;
share|improve this answer
    
Is this thread safe though? –  McGarnagle Jun 9 '12 at 6:05
    
@HackedByChinese Thanks for the suggestion , What is the difference between my approach and the approach you suggested to simplify my code.Thanks. –  freebird Jun 9 '12 at 6:07
    
Autoimplemented properties automatically generate the backing field, so you don't have to include them in your source. –  HackedByChinese Jun 9 '12 at 6:24
2  
Wouldn`t a simple Lazy be enough? –  L.B Jun 9 '12 at 8:33

Outside of the two bromides "globals are bad" and "properties are good" ... there's nothing intrinsically wrong with your approach. Go for it!

IMHO .. PSM

share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks for the advice , can I ask what is IMHO PSM , might be sounding silly.Thanks. –  freebird Jun 9 '12 at 6:05
    
"PSM" is my name :). "IMHO" means "In My Humble Opinion". And I honestly didn't notice that you were already using properties: I thought you just had a bunch of public static variables. Which, IMHO, can be perfectly OK. –  paulsm4 Jun 9 '12 at 6:06
    
:) Thanks a lot , something new to learn.Thanks. –  freebird Jun 9 '12 at 6:08

The reason why you do not see the variable after you instantiate that class object is because the variables are declared as static. Static variables are meant to be used by that manor ClassName.variableName or ClassName.PropertyName

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.