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I'm trying to compile a network application on Ubuntu 12.04 using GCC and glibc 2.15 Let's consider the following code as the example:

a.cpp:

#include <sys/select.h>
void func ()
{
  int fd;
  fd_set fds;
  FD_SET(fd, &fds);
}

I can successfully compile these lines with the command "gcc -c -Wsign-conversion a.cpp", but I have the following warning after I add either -O1 or -O2 option:

gcc -c -O1 -Wsign-conversion a.cpp
a.cpp:6: warning: conversion to ‘long unsigned int’ from ‘int’ may change the sign of the result [-Wsign-conversion]

I have the warning for both gcc 4.4, 4.5 and 4.6.

UPD: If I understand correctly, my example strictly conforms to FD_SET semantics, so I should have no warnings in this case.

What's the reason of this? How can I avoid it?

Thanks.

UPD: Looks like it's the known issue now - http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lib.glibc.alpha/22344 . But I can't understand what should I do with it on GLIBC 2.15? Just wait for the next GLIBC?

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But you compiled it WITH this warning option so you must have wanted to detect it???? –  mathematician1975 Jun 9 '12 at 11:26
    
Yes, I want to dectect such issues in my code. But the question is why I have this warning when I compile in optimized mode ONLY. –  Rom098 Jun 9 '12 at 11:27
    
Moreover, if I understand correctly, my example strictly conforms to FD_SET semantics, so I should have no warnings in this case. –  Rom098 Jun 9 '12 at 11:36
    
At least the compiler should warn that fd is uninitialised. And you should call FD_ZERO, because fds is uninitialised also. BTW: are you compiling C with a C++ compiler? DONT! –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 11:52
2  
This is a known issue on some gcc/glibc combinations. I don't know if it is fixed as of glibc-2.15. –  Brett Hale Jun 9 '12 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

To fix this problem, I used a separate wrapper source file, and disabled warnings for just that source file.

CMacroWrapper.h:

#include <sys/select.h>
namespace CMacroWrapper
{
  void FdSet(int fd, fd_set *set);
}

CMacroWrapper.cpp:

#include "CMacroWrapper.h"

#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wsign-conversion"

void CMacroWrapper::FdSet(int fd, fd_set *set)
{
  FD_SET(fd, set);
}

main.cpp:

#include "CMacroWrapper.h"
void func ()
{
  int fd;
  fd_set fds;
  FD_ZERO(&fds);
  CMacroWrapper::FdSet(fd, &fds);
}

I find that CMacroWrapper namespace useful to just add any new system header macros that pop up in compiler warnings. It does add an extra function call, but it's worth it for the warning peace-of-mind. Or you can wrap all the FD_ macros for consistency, if you like.

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