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So, I'm trying to write a function which return a pointer to an ADT, in the heep. the problem is that I can't manipulate it after the memory allocation. here is a simplified code

typedef struct _entity {
        int value;
        } *Entity;


Entity *new_entity(){
Entity *ptr = (Entity*)malloc(sizeof(struct _entity));
assert( ptr );

(*ptr)->value = 5; // program crashes after this line

return ptr;
}

the error is: Unhandled exception at 0x013e1665 in test.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation writing location 0xcdcdce21.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
typedef struct _entity {
    int value;
} *Entity;
  ^
  ^

You probably don't want this *. Otherwise, you are typedef-ing Entity to be a pointer to a struct, rather than a struct. So your code would become:

typedef struct _entity {
    int value;
} Entity;


Entity *new_entity(void) {
    Entity *ptr = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));
    assert( ptr );

    ptr->value = 5;

    return ptr;
}

If, for some reason, you do want Entity to be a pointer type, then the rest of your code is wrong. You've malloced some space for the pointer, but not for what it's pointing to. It would need to be more like this:

Entity *ptr = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));  // Allocate an Entity
*ptr = malloc(sizeof(**ptr));        // Allocate a *Entity

But there's almost certainly no need to do this.

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It has to be a pointer otherwise it will be lost when I return the pointer (the stuck frame will be lost) –  Kirill Kulakov Jun 9 '12 at 12:15
    
@kirill: You now have two levels of indirection (i.e. a pointer to a pointer to a struct), whereas you probably only need one (i.e. a pointer to a struct). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 9 '12 at 12:18
    
well, that works but I can't understand why, could u explain? –  Kirill Kulakov Jun 9 '12 at 12:34
    
@kirill: The aim of this function is to create a new struct instance, right? So you need to dynamically allocate one, and return its address. But you don't need to dynamically allocate the pointer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 9 '12 at 12:35

you shouldn't use both * and ->, one of them is enough

ptr->value = 5 

OR

(*ptr).value = 5
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