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Consider the following example Bash one-liner in which the letters "h", "e" and "o" are removed from the word "hello" one at a time, in that order. Only the two "l" letters remain;

$ echo "hello" | tr -d h | tr -d e | tr -d o
ll

I am trying to find a method for displaying the output of each command to the screen within the one liner, so others running it can see what is going on. Continuing with the above example I would like output as follows;

$ echo "hello" | tr -d h | tr -d e | tr -d o
hello
ello
llo
ll

Is this possible? As per the operation of the one-liner above, we are carrying the output from command to command with the vertical pipe. So I assume I would have to break from the pipe to print to stdout, which would then interrupt the "command chain" I have written. Or perhaps tee can be used here, but I can't seem to achieve the desire affect. UPDATE: tee won't work because it's output is still within the boundaries of the pipe, duh!

Many thanks.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

This only works on a terminal:

echo hello  | tee /dev/tty |
    tr -d h | tee /dev/tty |
    tr -d e | tee /dev/tty |
    tr -d o

The /dev/tty device redirects output to the current terminal, no matter where the normal output goes.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I needed, thank you! – jwbensley Jun 10 '12 at 14:01

You can tee the output directly to the terminal:

echo hello  | tee /proc/$$/fd/1 |
    tr -d h | tee /proc/$$/fd/1 |
    tr -d e | tee /proc/$$/fd/1 |
    tr -d o

$$ is the shell's PID.

share|improve this answer
    
Note, this depends on your system having the /proc file system, which is almost certainly true for a Linux system, but not, e.g., for Mac OS X. – chepner Jun 9 '12 at 13:39
    
What's wrong with /dev/tty? – Dennis Williamson Jun 9 '12 at 16:01
    
Great suggestion, /dev/tty is better but this is still a great answer, thanks! – jwbensley Jun 10 '12 at 14:01

IMO, if this is real world problem and not how is it possible to do in bash, then instead of the bash madness starting X tr and Y tee processes, you can try a simple perl oneliner:

echo hello | perl -nale 'foreach $i (qw(h e o)) {@F=map{s/$i//g;print $_;$_}@F}'

will print:

ello
llo
ll

or if your really want bash (as @chepner suggested)

echo "hello" | while read w; do for c in h e o; do w=${w//$c};echo $w; done;done

or

while read w; do for c in h e o; do w=${w//$c};echo $w; done;done < wordlist
share|improve this answer

With a small little loop:

w="hello" ; for c in h e o .; do echo $w; w=$(echo $w | tr -d $c); done

The . is only used for a brief solution. After reading the question more carefully, I tested and found, that it works in a pipe chain too:

w="hello" ; for c in h e o .; do echo $w; w=$(echo $w | tr -d $c); done | less 
# pure bash buildins, see chepner's comment
w="hello" ; for c in h e o .; do echo $w; w=${w/$c}; done
share|improve this answer
    
You can replace tr with parameter expansion as well: w=${w//$c} removes all occurrences of $c from $w. – chepner Jun 9 '12 at 14:26
    
@chepner: Yes, since it is pure bash, I included it. – user unknown Jun 9 '12 at 15:00

But this WILL work:

tmp=`echo "hello"`; echo $tmp; tmp=`echo $tmp | tr -d h`; echo $tmp; tmp=`echo $tmp | tr -d e`; echo $tmp; echo $C | tr -d o

It's ugly, but it works. The solution creates variables to store each pass and then show them all:

tmp=`echo "hello"`
echo $tmp
tmp=`echo $tmp | tr -d h`
echo $tmp
tmp=`echo $tmp | tr -d e`
echo $tmp
echo $C | tr -d o

I cannot find a better solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this will kill all parallelism, which might be problematic for huge data chunks. If you're not echoing "hello" but a 1TB file, you're in trouble ;) – bitmask Jun 9 '12 at 12:54
    
Right, but I think that is not the case: the message is "hello" and the operation is a letter substitution... – Fèlix Galindo Allué Jun 9 '12 at 12:56
    
No need for process substitution: tmp=${tmp//h}, etc. – chepner Jun 9 '12 at 14:28

You could do it using a fifo (or a regular file) on which you listen:

mkfifo tmp.fifo
tail -f tmp.fifo

Then just run your command on a separate shell:

echo hello | tee -a tmp.fifo | tr -d e | tee -a tmp.fifo | tr -d o
share|improve this answer

You can use tee - as - represents the console:

echo "hello" | tee - | tr -d h | tee - | tr -d e | tee - | tr -d o

Hope that helped!

EDIT:

This solution WILL NOT WORK because stdout gets blocked and reused by all the commands that produce output by means of stdout.

I will not delete the answer as it clearly states that it doesn't solve the problem but ALSO SHOWS that this kind of solution is NOT VALID and why. If someone finds himself in the same situation will discover this information, and that will be useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Bizarrely, this isn't working as expected; echo "hello" | tee - | tr -d h | tr -d e | tr -d o is outputing "ll ll" so its the finaly output but back near the start?! – jwbensley Jun 9 '12 at 12:31
    
Still +1 for the use of - within tee :) – jwbensley Jun 9 '12 at 12:31
    
Strange! I'll take a look in a second, and try variations. – Fèlix Galindo Allué Jun 9 '12 at 12:34
1  
To my surprise... Right, it won't work, the stdout in blocked until the whole line is finished, and all the tees get chained!!! IT WON'T WORK, THIS ANSWER DOESN'T SOLVE YOUR QUESTION. Sorry. – Fèlix Galindo Allué Jun 9 '12 at 12:41
1  
That cannot work because both the original as well as the copy go to stdout (fd 1) and thus are transformed by the subsequent commands. – bitmask Jun 9 '12 at 12:44

Room for one more?

echo "hello" | tee >(tr -d h | tee >(tr -d e | tee >(tr -d o) ) )

or

 echo "hello" | 
tee >(tr -d h | 
tee >(tr -d e | 
tee >(tr -d o  ) ) ) 

output is:

hello
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ ello
llo
ll

a little persuasive coercion is required to eliminate corruption by ubuntu@ubuntu:~$

cat <(echo "hello" | tee >(tr -d h | tee >(tr -d e | tee >(tr -d o) ) ) )

output is:

hello
ello
llo
ll
share|improve this answer
    
short one liner - if prompt is null no corrosive coercion is necessary - as minimal as possible? – ekim Mar 8 '13 at 5:59
    
"no lights, no car, not a single luxury it's primitive as can be" - completely generic std IO not even console - – ekim Mar 9 '13 at 14:35

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